Easyist way to remove all components from circuit boards

I have drums in my back yard filled with scrapped circuit boards from everything. I would like to remove all the components. I do not have a need for the components or circuit boards for any electronic purpose.

I want the flat printed circuit boards. I will panel a room in my house entirely with the flat circuit boards.

I was thinking, I can use the toaster oven and the gas stove top with some gloves to heat up. The overhead exhaust fan perfectly removes the fumes. A pair of tweezers, needle nose and just shake and pick them off.

Does anyone else have a better idea, advice, experience ? This is the best I can come up with.

Clamp by the edges in a vice and hit with a hand grinder. Maybe enlist help to replace the board in the vice with another one, or you do it and the other person handle the grinder.

Eye protection is a must!

Paul

Consider using a Solder Pot -- like in this video:

For the SMD chips, I would use a vacuum SMD pick-up tool, like:

JIAN YA NA SMD BGA Vacuum Suction Placement Machine -- which I've never used, so can't vouch!

There are also simple un-powered "pencil" style ones that I have used, but they are of dubious effect. My soldering station has a powered vacuum placement tool that works quite well, but the whole thing was around $100 at Circuit Specialists.

The angle grinder would probably scathe the surface of the circuit board.

I do have a solder pot. Mine is about as small as that one. I never thought to fill it and use the meniscus to wave unsolder the bottom surface. Great idea, thank you very much.

I would get a hot air gun and pick them off.

I am surprised someone has not mentioned - again - this:

Heat with hot air or flame, have a sturdy wooden block ready on the concrete floor, when hot, holding with heavy pliers, hit the board by the edge on the wooden block.

I have all the hot air & flame tools. The problem is for me, the only place I can do that is in my garage, which is FREEZING COLD. The parts cool off from ambient room temperature quickly and play fun games with me. Until I replace the comfortable linoleum in my kitchen with diamond plate, I am stuck with keeping filthy dangerous messes in the garage.

I would question whether this is worthwhile - the components will only stand so many heat cycles and the removed parts may be unreliable or not work at all - a real pain when you’ve resoldered them back on a new board.
Especially true with uncontrolled heating cycles

the components will only stand so many heat cycles and the removed parts may be unreliable or not work at all

He doesn’t want the components, he wants the PCBs.

hammy:
I would question whether this is worthwhile - the components will only stand so many heat cycles and the removed parts may be unreliable or not work at all - a real pain when you’ve resoldered them back on a new board.

The components are of little use to me. I take the big aluminum heat sinks and throw them into a pile. I do not have the motivation to sort and salvage every used component and gamble if it works. I have 50 gallon drums filled with circuit boards from everything. I have a room lined with boxes all organized for all the components I use. They are bought in bulk from China, and 1 order normally cost less than I spend to eat lunch.

The purpose, if you read the initial posting - is to salvage the flat printed circuit boards, to use as paneling complete walls ceiling to floor in 1 room. Otherwise, this pile of boards is e-waste that I have yet to find a vendor to pay me any scrap value.

Paul_KD7HB:
Clamp by the edges in a vice and hit with a hand grinder. Maybe enlist help to replace the board in the vice with another one, or you do it and the other person handle the grinder.

Eye protection is a must!

Paul

Don't do that, very bad idea - if you want to fill your lungs with lead its the way to go however.

Grinding anything that can contain toxic heavy metals is to be avoided

DocStein99:
The purpose, if you read the initial posting - is to salvage the flat printed circuit boards, to use as paneling complete walls ceiling to floor in 1 room.

Wouldn't the components, on the board, look pretty cool? Also, if aesthetics is the point, are the bulk of the traces on the backside of the boards? If so, plenty of circuit board aesthetics on the backs--maybe mount them with the backs facing out, using spacers? Cheap spacers can be made by cutting up stiff plastic tubing/hose.

Or, if mostly surface mount, then perhaps only remove the taller components, and leave the SMDs on the boards. Thus, perhaps, far less time with the fire/solder pot, making it a more viable solution?

ReverseEMF:
Wouldn't the components, on the board, look pretty cool? Also, if aesthetics is the point, are the bulk of the

I can't imagine how painful it would be for me to slip accidentally and land against a wall that was covered with 386 motherboards with all of their components in place. This would also make it impossible for me to mount any shelves. They would all collect dust in a matter of months, and the room would look like the inside of a junk yard.

You could always buy wallpaper , there’s no lead in it ...

I would just use my hot air gun to heat the components one at a time and flick them off the board with a screwdriver blade. That might get tedious for a full roomfull of boards.

If you really want to make a production line for it, I would set up a linear flame burner with a steel bar just in front of it. Then drag the boards over the bar to scrape off the components just as they are heated. That does assume 100% SMD, so maybe you have to deal with through-hole components as a separate step first.

My favourite desolder tool is a Hakko 808. I can usually re-use both the components and the board with this tool. Without the Hakko, I have to choose between saving the board or saving the component.

MorganS:
My favourite desolder tool is a Hakko 808. I can usually re-use both the components and the board with this tool. Without the Hakko, I have to choose between saving the board or saving the component.

I wanted one of those, but am too cheap to spend the money. Instead I spend months trying to make one myself with a radio-shack desoldering iron and a vacuum pump (that fails). Waiting to find one used for flea market cash.

It is the most expensive portable tool I own. But absolutely worth it for the amount of desoldering I do.

But then my most expensive hand tool is probably the $600 mil-spec crimpers.

DocStein99:
I can't imagine how painful it would be for me to slip accidentally and land against a wall that was covered with 386 motherboards with all of their components in place. This would also make it impossible for me to mount any shelves. They would all collect dust in a matter of months, and the room would look like the inside of a junk yard.

Well, keep bandages and antiseptic on hand. And install a dust incinerator. Bonus, that new-fried-dust smell :wink:

Come on, man, you gotta suffer for the tech aesthetic!

I am still in limbo deciding. The original idea was to mount all the motherboards as a upper wall border around the room. This way I could still use thembif I ever wanted to, but probably never see that day.

Paneling the walls will be alot of work, but so rewarding in ways that nothing else can do.

My house collects alot of dust, and I take little pleasure in maintaining that. I wish I could just have a huge vacuum in center ceiling, that would remove all the dust, pet hair and lint - with the flick of a switch.

DocStein99:
...Paneling the walls will be alot of work, but so rewarding in ways that nothing else can do....

I am so looking forward to being retired next month!