best way to get components from pcb

Hi,
What is the fastest way to strip a pcb of components? I am currently using desoldering wick and a soldering iron, but it is too slow and only allows me to do one component at a time. Any help is needed.
Thanks in advance,
Jared

If surface mount maybe a hot plate?

Though hole components can be more awkward, you still need to use solderwick, even the tiniest bit of solder will cause it to "stick" in the hole.

Though hole components can be more awkward, you still need to use solderwick, even the tiniest bit of solder will cause it to "stick" in the hole

they are mainly through hole components, but I am hoping to eliminate the need for solder wick because the soldering iron I have is too low-powered to desolder any "newer" boards.

If you don't need to save the actual PCB and just want the components I usually use a heat gun onto the backside of the board. Once it gets molten you just smash the corner of the board onto something and the components fall right out. Then you can clean them up with solder wick if they fly off with some solder on them.

I usually use a heat gun onto the backside of the board

thanks, i will try that (if my mom will let me get a heat gun ;)). Will it harm heat sensitive components though?
Also, what precautions and safety are needed.

Also try with a solder sucker. It sucks the solder out of the hole.

I scavenged a toaster oven,
I set it on high, and leave a new piece of solder on the board, once it melts I take out the board and bang it on a metal box
gets 90% off the first pass
if its larger(say a car amp) a blowtorch to the back traces pops out large inductors/caps/resistors

Also try with a solder sucker. It sickes the solder out of the hole.

good idea, but wouldn't it only do one joint at a time?

@ winner10920: a toaster oven is a good idea, but there is some risk involved (i'm guessing :)). Also, where would i get one cheaply (i garage-sale often and haven't seen one yet and second hand stores are too expensive).
Thanks otherwise.

good idea, but wouldn't it only do one joint at a time?

Yes. You get pretty quick, and not very helpful for surface mounted stuff (which I don't use anyway). Clearly not as efficient as some of the more industrial techniques outlined by others here, though.

jaredpi,
Thrift stores are great for used appliances, seen toaster ovens as cheap as $2. I actually got mine out of a trash can on our morning walk. I think people will buy a new one rather than clean the used one.
Don't forget to wear oven mitts or heavy gloves.
TomJ

I use a paint stripper (essentially a hairdryer on steroids), it gets the board hot enough to melt all the solder in seconds - even multi layer pcbs with large ground planes. You don't even have to hit the board, components just fall off if you hold it upside down.

I acquired mine from our attic(figured my mom hasn't used it in years and wouldn't miss it), so idk where a cheap one would be
A drive around town on garbage night usully find some good old electronics, maybe you can find that toaster, I've noticed often things aren't broken when people throw them out, perhaps old or missing one part
I wouldn't sy its dangerous, tho you need to grab the extremely hot bord with pliers, and so long as you hit the board into the box nm cn go wrong, occasionally some molten solder will splatter backwards(safet glasses suggested)

Many parts will not tolerate long exposure to the heat from the paint stripper, be warned. Some parts are worth more with careful removal, and worthless after careless removal.

Thanks,
I think i will go with a heat gun or paint stripper.

Don’t forget to wear oven mitts or heavy gloves.

Would that also be for a heat gun?

Many parts will not tolerate long exposure to the heat from the paint stripper, be warned. Some parts are worth more with careful removal, and worthless after careless removal.

thanks, i will keep that in mind. Also, are there any components (other than IC’s and transistors) that should be removed before using a heat gun?
thank you,
Jared

Sparkfun has a cheap purpose built heatgun for this purpose:

ChipQuik was designed for desoldering surface mount chips:

jaredpi:
Would that also be for a heat gun?

You don't have to, but the board will get hot, so it is best to use something to protect your hands - you only get one set.

jaredpi:
thanks, i will keep that in mind. Also, are there any components (other than IC's and transistors) that should be removed before using a heat gun?
thank you,
Jared

Its mostly small surface mount components you have to worry about, but if you are quick and don't hold the heat gun on one patch for too long, you should be ok.
The other issue is anything plastic such as connectors. These will more than likely melt before you can remove them.

Anything which is screwed on, or held on by wires or connectors should be stripped off before using the heat.

I just crank my reflow oven up to desolder wait for it to get up to temperature, then reach in with my forceps grasp the board, and bang it down on the support grille.

Thanks,
@JoeN: thanks for the suggestion, but I already ordered a heat gun.
@Tom Carpenter: I think i will use oven mitts just in case. Also, i don’t really care about damaging the surface mount stuff.
@majenko; thanks, if a heat gun doesn’t work for some reason, i will try an oven

Just remember that heat guns are very hot, but also very directional. You have to move the gun around to spread the heat.
Don't get the end too close to the board (2" is good depending on the power), and don't keep it pointing at the same spot for more than a few seconds (10s max), otherwise the PCB may start to burn, producing nasty fumes, and may eventually ignite.
Make sure you do it either outside or in a well ventalated area, just in case the board gets too hot as the fumes stink and the smell persists for at least a couple of days if you are inside.

For components which have legs bent at a funny angle, as they come through the board, you may have to pull on the component on the other side with a pair of plyers (watch you hands so they don't get burned). You can also as an alternative use a screwdriver on the solder side to bend the pins as you heat it.

Okay, thanks, I'll keep that in mind. I was planning on doing it outside anyway.
Jared