Etching PCB with vineager and Hydrogen peroxide in an earthenware dish?

Hello, does anyone if I can use a dish made of earthenware to etch a PCB without damaging it?

Thank you in advance.

Yes I use Ferric Chloride in a similar dish. If your peroxide is 30% be very careful ! !

Not sure if you will have luck with your combination of vinegar and hydrogen peroxide.

Gotta be GLAZED!

Be sure to use vinegar and NOT glacial acedic acid.

I've never heard of etching with vinegar and H2O2... I did HCl+H2O2, and then switched to CuCl2+HCl w/H2O2 to regen etchant, so I don't have to dump copper compounds down the drain.

A ceramic plate with a glossy glaze should hold up just fine - though I recommend using tupperware instead. That way the walls are higher, you can put a lid on it, and you pretty much can't break it - all of which reduce the risk of spilling a noxious corrosive mess everywhere.

Pick up one of theses.
Go over the foil area every now and then.
Speeds up the etching process 10 fold.
Always use eye and skin protection, etch in a well ventilated area.

Here

Plastic photographic development trays would be fine, if they are still easily available(!)

With earthenware you have to consign that dish to non-food use in the future, since it is porous. With ceramic you'll probably need to keep photo-resist side uppermost to prevent it being scraped off.

I've seen this mix mentioned online before but without much detail that I'd trust. I'd be interested to hear how well it goes. Please let us know how it goes.

Hello everyone,

Of course the dish used was glazed.

The mix tried was with 3% Hydrogen peroxide and white vinegar. I couldn't manage to etch my board with this mix. I tried several combinations of each product. Pure Hydrogen peroxide oxidized a bit the copper but stopped to work quite fast and pure vinegar led nowhere. Adding salt helped a bit but again the reaction stopped somewhat quickly.

My conclusion: 3% Hydrogen peroxide is too weak. I couldn't get a more concentrated solution (10% or at least 5%) in my area therefore I have chosen another technique at the moment. I have finally used the classical Ferric Chloride (bought as granules) but more specifically the sponge etching variation. It has given a good result although one needs some time and elbow grease to have the PCB completely etched (I don't know the copper layer's exact thickness on my PCB but I suspect it's indeed thick - it's a Russian surplus bought on eBay).

I have also read somewhere that Hydrogen peroxide diluted in water looses its corrosive power with time but I don't know how true it is and if it has anything to do with the failure I have seen.

I have finally used the classical Ferric Chloride (bought as granules) but more specifically the sponge etching variation. It has given a good result although one needs some time and elbow grease to have the PCB completely etched

Pre-heat the solution to 150’F.
Use one of these brushes below.
You can etch a 1 oz PCB in 5-8 minutes.
(heat solution in a Pyrex flask sitting in water in a electric frying pan then add it to your tray)
HERE

2014-12-07_11-37-08.jpg

however long it took for the ferric chloride, multiply that times 5 for the vinegar.

also, the stoneware might neutralize the acid. much better off using tupperware or some plastics.

the salt is only to precipitate out the copper so that it does not remain in solution and stop the etching process.

I think you can recover some of the copper with electrolysis. that way, when you discard the toxic solution it is not quite so bad.

I've never heard of etching with vinegar and H2O2... I did HCl+H2O2, and then switched to CuCl2+HCl w/H2O2 to regen etchant, so I don't have to dump copper compounds down the drain.

You dumped the HCl and H2O2 mix? You know, when you are done etching with that, it -becomes- CuCl2+HCl.

In fact, you don't even need to add H2O2. Merely bubbling air through it regenerates it. It is the oxygen. Adding H2O2 works, but you keep getting more and more CuCl2 etching solution over time.

https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/Homebrew_PCBs/info

Scroll down to "Hydrochloric acid and Hydrogen Peroxide aka Cupric Chloride" http://techref.massmind.org/techref/pcbetch.htm

http://techref.massmind.org/techref/pcb/etch/CuCl2Calc.htm

That's my own plan, HCL and H202. You don't get much greener than never needing to dispose of the toxic solution in the first place.

as a note, once you have a high concentration of copper, you can use electrolysis to pull it out of soltion onto a bar immersed in solution.

then, if you want, paint your board, remove the etch resist and reverse the electrolysis and build up the thickness of the copper on your board.

dave-in-nj: then, if you want, paint your board, remove the etch resist and reverse the electrolysis and build up the thickness of the copper on your board.

If you want to solder to iron or steel, copper plating first helps enormously.

Hi All, I have only ever used Ferric Chloride, it's messy, highly corrosive and stains like I don't know what! I have ruined pants, shirts all sorts. I like the idea of some of the newer ones, but price and short life??

Last year I brought a couple of 2.5L clear plastic containers from the £1 shop, one contains the Ferric cloride about a Litre, to the other I add hot water to about 1.5" deep then what I do is stand one inside the other, creating a hot water bath so the FC is quite warm, the result quick etching.

I make my PCB's with Diptrace which is FREE and very good for all Electronic CAD work, I also use the Laser printer meathod for producing the art work, etc.

Hope it helps. Regards

Mel.

Bubbling air through CuCl solution is a real pain in the ass. You're doing it outside (HCl fumes even in low concentrations damage exposed metal), and all the little bubbles splatter droplets of CuCl and HCl around, killing nearby vegetation and staining wood and concrete. Temperature swings dramatically impact reaction rate. Worse still, if you run out of acid, it foams, and then it really overflows. And the stuff is acidic and electrochemically corrosive, slowly degrades the rubber air tube, and also dissolves many airstones.

Adding a few ml of 30% hydrogen peroxide to an established solution of CuCl/CuCl2+HCl is way easier, and you can do it while it's etching, to keep the etchant solution clear enough to watch the progress of the etch.

polymorph: Etching with straight H2O2+HCl does indeed leave you with CuCl/CuCl2 in HCl after etching, but not enough to etch your next board at an acceptable speed (and the H2O2 breaks down during storage). So it ends up being a once-through process.

A nice concentrated solution of CuCl2 in HCl works very well, and you can regenerate it with 30% H2O2, and it doesn't slowly dilute it, and you don't need to fart around with bubbling air through stuff, and the operating cost is just about nil.

Did you look at any of my links? Lots of people are starting with HCl (pool supply, or brick/concrete cleaner) and hydrogen peroxide (low concentration from the drugstore, higher from beauty supply) and ending up with CuCl2 that they use over and over. Yes, most I think add more hydrogen peroxide due to the problems you outlined with bubbling air through it.

The H2O2 is only added to add oxygen. It doesn't sit in solution, so it doesn't matter than it gasses out over time.

I've used plastic containers bought at the local housewares store without any trouble. Used both HCl and ferric chloride. Never failed me.

I've had pickles stored in vinegar in a plastic container, so I suppose for your project something plastic should do just fine.

And if plastic does just fine, well, earthenware should do just the same. I use 10% concentration HCl and 3% hydrogen peroxide. At those concentrations you don't get any melting or decomposition of the plastic.

Why vinegar BTW? Can't you just get some HCl at the hardware store? It's probably quicker.

If you're curious, here's the HCl process I use (spanish, sorry):

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wgw_rV7KNGQ

I've been done with ferric chloride fro years since I discovered the Muriatic Acid and Hydrogen peroxide solution. No need to go back that awful stuff.