Getting 1000V from Arduino

Hi,

I’m about to start a project involving piezoelectrics that need about 1000V to function. I think I’m going to use Arduino for it, but I was wondering, is it possible to get 1000V voltages out of it ? I know it outputs up to 5V and about 50mA, but is there a way to amplify the voltage without risking any damage to the unit ?
Thanks in advance !

Rule of thumb: maximum 20mA output current of Arduino pin.

Which power do you want to use to generate the 1000V ? If the Arduino 5V is used, it will be connected to the Arduino, and you need to take care how you design the circuit.

How much current do you need ? Only a static voltage or do you want to output a frequency or switching output ? I assume only a static voltage and very little current.

You need a driver with transistors or mosfet, then a transformer, then probably a voltage multiplier. You also need special fast switching diodes, since the UF4007 can go to 1000V. Also many capacitors are only up to 1000V.

Do you want to measure the voltage with the Arduino ? To be sure it is 1000V and not somewhere between 200V and 2000V.

Did you know that you can not measure such a low current / high voltage with a voltmeter or multimeter ? When you connect a voltmeter, the impedance of the voltagemeter (for example 10M) will drop the voltage a lot. After you disconnect the voltmeter, the voltage could go up a few hundred volts without you knowing it.

My advice : Don't do it. You need to be an expert in high voltages. It is dangerous. Perhaps you can buy a high voltage power supply.

Someone1348:
I know it outputs up to 5V and about 50mA

Nope.

Peter_n:
My advice : Don’t do it. You need to be an expert in high voltages. It is dangerous.

Yep. Not a project for beginners.

I highly recommend some transformer or optical isolation to keep you and the Arduino safe.

And, I have to echo the WARNINGS: If you are asking this kind of question, you should probably NOT be messing around with lethal voltages!!! (If the current is limited, 1000V may not be lethal because the voltage will drop when the current flows through your body... But PLEASE BE CAREFUL!!!!)

I'm about to start a project involving piezoelectrics that need about 1000V to function. I think I'm going to use Arduino for it

If you weren't a Newbie I'd ask you if you were on drugs. Unless you are a HV power supply design engineer, I think you are barking up the wrong tree. Clearly you don't realize how ridiculous that question is. I built a 200V EL Backlight power supply using a couple of ATtiny85s but getting 1000V is another story. What is your current requirement in mA @ 1000V ?

Try researching Boost Power Supplies. You're question is more to do with HV Boost Power Supplies than it is to do with Arduinos. Unless there is a HV Power Supply design engineer on the forum you are probably wasting your time.

Optical or mechanical isolation between the arduino and high voltage device is suggested. High voltage devices like below might be used to generate the required voltage.

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Shocking-Electric-Shock-Novelty-Plastic-Pen-Prank-Trick-Joke-Gag-Funny-Toy-Gift-/281431377296?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item41869e0590

http://www.harborfreight.com/electronic-fly-swatter-61351.html

You could obtain this control voltage by low pass filtering an Arduino PWM output.

or for $5 you can get a DAC and filter that. https://learn.adafruit.com/mcp4725-12-bit-dac-tutorial/using-with-arduino

Thanks for such quick replies.

Well, I admit I have limited knowledge in electronics... All I know is filters, capacitors and coils. The project I have requires a high voltage because the piezoelectric polymer we'll use needs a high electrical field to polarize and bend the way we want it to. I need a way to control such high voltage and be able to control the polymer that way. Of course if you judge it too ambitious for a beginner I'd rather look for help from someone from my school, but I want to find out what I can do.

I think an adjustable voltage up to 1000V is hard to do when you are not familiar with it.

You can search for : arduino geigercounter Have a look at some schematics. Those geigercounters use often a tube that requires 200 to 300V. Some use a single coil, others use a tranformer.

A controllable voltage is harder, and up to 1000V is not the same as 300V. At 1000V the high voltage could cause sparks and could 'leak' into other parts of the circuit.

I think this question has been asked before on this forum. Perhaps half a year ago. Are you doing a project that someone else has abandonnned ?

Hi, what is your application of piezo that needs 1000V.

I'd be googling, I would imagine that the supply needs to be of low current capacity, say 10mA or so.

If you do not need to control the voltage level, then make it as simple as possible, 1000V of any power is not good around semiconductors rated at lower levels.

Tom...... :) Please we need more info about your application to give you accurate responses.

… I hate to say this but for your own good buy an external brick type HV supply. As you have been told… Several times already this is virtually undo-able with your level of expertise and you are likely to either seriously hurt your self of destroy your board…
I’m a retired engineer with much experience in HV work and I’d be Most careful were I to even contemplate such a design…
Especially with an Arduino as it is too open for safe control of the HV supply… How did you intend to monitor it’s output voltage?.
What provisions do you think are adequate for controlling this thing…
I did see however a 2KV brick supply on Ebay some time back for $14.00 and I own a 2" CRT that I was thinking about driving with an Arduino but the deflection circuitry was more trouble than it was worth…
I do feel that what you wish to accomplish… given the data in this thread so far is bound to fail catastrophically and possibly you with it.
However should you wish to undertake such a task… Go Wiki Cockcroft Walton voltage multipliers…
There was a rather dangerous article in Instructables recently… That I could get working properly, However I wouldn’t advise it for You.
Electric shocks of that nature CAN and WILL stop your Heart… Should you put your fingers in the wrong place and Death is rather Final… Think about it and do some serious reading first on Electrocution… It Can Happen, faster than you will Ever know.
IMNSHO.

Doc

I built a 200V EL Backlight power supply using a couple of ATtiny85s

BTW, while I was working on this circuit I accidentally touched the choke coil and got shocked. My arm recoiled instinctively. Imagine you reaction if you touched 1000V. They say most injuries from HV shock are not from the voltage but accidents resulting from the recoil.

Another inexpensive potential high voltage supply.

http://www.ebay.com/itm/New-USB-Powered-Electric-Plasma-Ball-Desk-Science-Kids-Office-/310499266909?pt=Lamps_US&hash=item484b32d15d

Someone1348: Well, I admit I have limited knowledge in electronics... All I know is filters, capacitors and coils. The project I have requires a high voltage because the piezoelectric polymer we'll use needs a high electrical field to polarize and bend the way we want it to. I need a way to control such high voltage and be able to control the polymer that way. Of course if you judge it too ambitious for a beginner I'd rather look for help from someone from my school, but I want to find out what I can do.

You could start by actually telling people what you're doing. "Control 1000V with an Arduino" only contains about 0.0001% of the information needed.

How many volts? How many amps? What do you mean by "control"?

Why would be nice too...