Help figuring out what stuff to use for project and how to do it

Hello all! My name is Carbon Phoss and I currently working on making a Ray gun replica. So, I am looking to make a custom circuit board that is able to provide sound effects and control 2 different motors in the prop. This is also why I am avoiding things like SD cards for the sound effects, since I want to make the board as small as possible.

So I am basically looking for chips that are able to have sound triggered as well being able to control mini motors.For sound I have a chip by Nuvoton called ISD2360, but I have had no luck in figuring out how to actually program the thing.

I am kinda new to this whole circuitry stuff, so I’d really appreciate any suggestions you might have to offer. Thanks for reading!

The current, incomplete data sheet on the ISD2360 is dated 2012. Do you have a link to an up to date data sheet? Are you using the chip in a stand-alone circuit or connected to a host controller?

Your requirement for the project to be "as small as possible" can get REALLY, REALLY, expensive. Are you sure you want to go there?

Can we assume an Arduino is somewhere in your project?

Paul

IMHO... using a micro SD card/socket is NOT a big deal.. and shouldnt take up any more room than your original board of choice.

Here is an example of a custom board I made. (next to an Uno with WaveShield stacked on top)


Its basically an Arduino UNO and Adafruit Waveshield merged into one board.. using all SMD components..

(all made in my 'lab' using a $17 toaster oven from Wal-Mart.. and some pcbs I designed and got fab'd from some China pcb house)

So it gives my my base Arduino/brain.. and Audio (.wav) file playback..

What you do NOT see is... there is a micro SD card/socket on the bottom.. to not only hold my .wav files.. but it also holds .txt files.. that has parameters to set-up my program/sketch in 'custom' ways..

Its very easy to swap audio files this way as well.

Design and code time aside... the costs of the board/hardware itself is like $15 bucks or something.. less if parts were bought in bulk.

Paul_KD7HB:
The current, incomplete data sheet on the ISD2360 is dated 2012. Do you have a link to an up to date data sheet? Are you using the chip in a stand-alone circuit or connected to a host controller?

Your requirement for the project to be “as small as possible” can get REALLY, REALLY, expensive. Are you sure you want to go there?

Can we assume an Arduino is somewhere in your project?

Paul

Hey Paul, thanks for your reply.

I don’t believe there any other recent data sheet beside the one you mention. As of right now, I am not sure which to use since I currently don’t know how to program the chip on it’s own, nor do I know how to use/program a host controller for it.

How expensive are we talking about? The circuit space I have in my model is not that big, so that’s why I need the circuitry to be small.

I am planning to use an Arduino, but just for the programming of an attiny which I will use to control leds for the project.

I am a bit lost as to what to do to control sound/motors so I was wondering if you could shed some light as to what things I am able to use.

Thanks!

xl97:
IMHO... using a micro SD card/socket is NOT a big deal.. and shouldnt take up any more room than your original board of choice.

Here is an example of a custom board I made. (next to an Uno with WaveShield stacked on top)


Its basically an Arduino UNO and Adafruit Waveshield merged into one board.. using all SMD components..

(all made in my 'lab' using a $17 toaster oven from Wal-Mart.. and some pcbs I designed and got fab'd from some China pcb house)

So it gives my my base Arduino/brain.. and Audio (.wav) file playback..

What you do NOT see is... there is a micro SD card/socket on the bottom.. to not only hold my .wav files.. but it also holds .txt files.. that has parameters to set-up my program/sketch in 'custom' ways..

Its very easy to swap audio files this way as well.

Design and code time aside... the costs of the board/hardware itself is like $15 bucks or something.. less if parts were bought in bulk.

I did plan on using an micro SD module, but I read somewhere that they are somewhat unreliable over time.

Your custom piece does look quite impressive! Is there somewhere you might of have shared the process of how you made your pcb? I would love to learn how to make something like it!

Thanks for your reply!

What part(s)? LOL..

I'm sure I have posted or talked any any/all steps to create the above here at one time or another.... (and I'm sure others have better approaches as well)

It also depends on your skill set, knowledge and equipment.

Here is the quick overview of MY process of things.

* Design/Create PCB:

    • I used EAGLE to design my schematic and board files.
    • It has a free version you can use
    • It may be better learning KiCAD over EAGLE since being bought out by AutoCAD
    • There are tons of tutorials for Eagle and I'm sure all flavors of circuit design apps if you need to learn how to design your project. (YouTube/Google)

* Manufacture/Fabricate the PCBS:

    • This all depends on where you live. For me, I reside in the USA.
    • OSH Park has great quality but not always the cheapest, USA located, with fast turn around mostly
    • No clue if you live in the UK
    • I order my pcb's from China fab houses (iTead, SEEED, Elecrow..etc) Cheap, decent quality, long shipping times though.

* PCB Assembly:

    • There are many ways to do this, and it depends on your skill set, board design and equipment.
    • I too wanted the smallest form factor I can make (while still generic enough to lend itself to many projects, which are mainly prop, sci-fi, fun related).. so my board is all SMD/SMT parts (surface mount design parts)
    • This meant no soldering by hand for the most part (not if I wanted pretty!)..lol.. This probably applies to you as well if you want the 'smallest possible'
    • I bought a $17.00 toaster oven from Wal-Mart and used it as my re-flow oven. (no extra add-ons, although many have modded them for have temp controlled and profile/curve stuff for more control)
    • I have a Cameo Vinyl plotter/cutter, and following a tutorials on Dangerous Prototypes on how to use it to make extremely nice/crisp solder masks.. I was ready to get ready.
    • Placed the pcb's on the desk, laid solder mask/stencil over board, smeared solder paste over stencil. Removed stencil. Populated board with all components required. Threw board(s) in toaster oven.... few minutes I had what you see above.

I've a done a few gun/blaster props as well: