Help Using Stepper Motor Coils as Electromagnetic Induction Generator

I’m working on a project that I’ve hit a roadblock on and could use some help.

I have a 3D-printed Wind Turbine that rotates in the wind, and I have a Hall Effect sensor connected to a MEGA 2560 to measure rotor shaft RPM and an Adafruit Anemometer to measure wind speed. I need to be able to find the power being generated by the system so I took apart a NEMA 14 1.8DEG stepper motor to use the coils as my generator and I fixed four neodymium magnets around the outside diameter of the shaft at equal spacing from each other. With this setup, the generator should produce electricity when the rotor shaft rotates.

My problem arises with what to do next. I have no idea how to connect the coils to the Arduino board, and I also have no idea how I can get the power being generated by the wind turbine from the generator once said generator is successfully connected to the Arduino.

Attached is a photo of the coils, which still have the NEMA connectors. I just have no idea which pins I’m supposed to connect to which ports on the Arduino to get the information that I need.

If anyone could provide some guidance on this issue, I would be grateful.

Reks:
I'm working on a project that I've hit a roadblock on and could use some help.

I have a 3D-printed Wind Turbine that rotates in the wind, and I have a Hall Effect sensor connected to a MEGA 2560 to measure rotor shaft RPM and an Adafruit Anemometer to measure wind speed. I need to be able to find the power being generated by the system so I took apart a NEMA 14 1.8DEG stepper motor to use the coils as my generator and I fixed four neodymium magnets around the outside diameter of the shaft at equal spacing from each other. With this setup, the generator should produce electricity when the rotor shaft rotates.

My problem arises with what to do next. I have no idea how to connect the coils to the Arduino board, and I also have no idea how I can get the power being generated by the wind turbine from the generator once said generator is successfully connected to the Arduino.

Attached is a photo of the coils, which still have the NEMA connectors. I just have no idea which pins I'm supposed to connect to which ports on the Arduino to get the information that I need.

If anyone could provide some guidance on this issue, I would be grateful.

Well, the obvious first step is to use your AC voltmeter to actually measure the voltage from your generator. You need to drive it at the maximum RPM to find the maximum AC voltage you will get.

Then to get the voltage/current from the generator use the things called "wire".

The you need a plan to have a load on the generator so you can control the voltage it produces.

What do you want the Arduino to do? For any connection to the Arduino, you have to rectify the AC voltage to get DC and then have some method of limiting the DC voltage to 5 volts or less.

You must have had some kind of plan before you went to all the work of modifying the stepper motor.

Paul

Hard to understand what you are trying to do here.
Your turbine will generate AC of some description, the magnitude which will be dependant on the rotation rate, and the coupling between the magnets and the coils.
I dont see what the Arduino has to do.

The Arduino runs on DC, so you will need to rectify and voltage regulate the AC from the generator.

A stepping motor already contains magnets, and when the shaft is rotated, the coils will produce AC current. It will not help to add additional magnets, and any modifications that you make to a motor are unlikely to work as well as the original.

See How-To: Use a Stepper Motor as a DC Generator - Make:

To measure power you need to provide a variable electronic load to the generator - otherwise the turbine will speed up
until friction losses balance power generation, which isn't useful.

By varying the load and measuring the electric power flowing into it, you can determine the power / load
response curve, and thus the max power point.

A stepper has very high cogging losses and is completely unsuitable in this role, a low-cogging
BLDC is better.