Help with wiring connections

Hi, I'm new to this arduino thing. Basically I tried to create arduino with a gsm shield to turn on and off a relay to help my father on a thing. It worked fine on one day, the other it simply didn't. Probably someone changed the connections, but I can't seem to find the error. He does receive the call but doesn't answer it. And he did before.

https://imgur.com/a/hOcw6mN

(pictures are too big to post as an attatchment)

If anyone could help, would be really appreciated. Thanks!

Hi, take a picture at lower resolution and attach that. We would prefer not to visit annoying image hosting sites!

I’m sorry! There you go :slight_smile:

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You mentioned a relay?

And you have not posted your program.

...R

For long-term usage, I think it is not good not use the breadboard. It is better to do one of the following: Solder components on a prototype board

IoT_hobbyist: For long-term usage, I think it is not good not use the breadboard.

Of course not, they are for prototyping! But it's too soon for soldering at this point. And used the right way, breadboards can be used to build and test prototypes that will be reliable for extended prototyping periods.

Unfortunately, a common mistake beginners make is frequently perpetuated by this forum. We tell beginners to get an Uno, even when we know they want to build circuits from components, not to plug in ready-made shields. We should recommend Nano or some other breadboard friendly Arduino in these cases.

PaulRB: Unfortunately, a common mistake beginners make is frequently perpetuated by this forum. We tell beginners to get an Uno, even when we know they want to build circuits from components, not to plug in ready-made shields. We should recommend Nano or some other breadboard friendly Arduino in these cases.

What I am forever pointing out. :cold_sweat:

But it is not so much the forum, but the website. The UNO is the "flagship" of Arduino which is the originator of the "Start with a UNO" meme. The design concept is you use a UNO and there is a "shield" to do whatever you need to do. However it was to start with, this is really no longer the case; there are some applications for which a shield does the job, but most projects rapidly expand beyond the capacity of the shields.

It is annoying when a "newbie" is advised to "get a UNO" after asking a "beginner" enquiry, but such advice just as often comes from another "newbie". :astonished:

I have lots of breadboards but I don't have any nanos and don't feel the need for them. When I want "small" they are not nearly small enough. Otherwise I have plenty of space for an Uno or Mega.

I find it perfectly convenient to connect an Uno or Mega to a breadboard with DuPont connectors. But there are many connections that I make while trying out things that don't need the use of a breadboard. And the nano can't really be used without attaching it to a breadboard.

...R

Robin2: And the Nano can't really be used without attaching it to a breadboard.

Unless of course, you have a soldering iron! :roll_eyes:

Paul__B: Unless of course, you have a soldering iron! :roll_eyes:

When I get to the soldering stage I just use an Atmega 328

...R

Robin2: the nano can't really be used without attaching it to a breadboard.

...R

For prototyping, it easily can. You can connect female-female Dupont connectors to the pin headers on both the Nano and on modules (which typically come with header pins, not pin sockets). The problem comes when you want to mount it in an enclosure, then you have no way to fasten it down. The tiny little screw holes are way too small, and the pins now get in the way.

A lot of my protos now consist of some Nano like board with pin headers installed and also soldered to a proto PCB. Then it's easy to make wire connections, component connections, or install pin headers adjacent to the pins. The proto boards mostly have decent mounting holes.

I put the pin headers upside down into stripboard / PCB. Lots of benefits like that. I typically solder the headers to the board and then push a Nano fitted with female headers onto it for test purposes. Once test is complete, I pop a board over the pins and solder it up. Once soldered, you then have long pins that don't need clipping and are ideal for test points or mounting a small daughter board over.