High quality breadboards

At this particular moment in history, is there a breadboard brand at any price that works really well? By "well", I mean-- the wire-ends insert easily and hold firmly. It seems like a great business opportunity unless there's one already out there. Every one of mine fails this standard.

The controller in the photo was built in 1982 using a standard metal base breadboard available at the time.


It worked perfectly on the first test and throughout the event.
What you should pay attention to is the white wires are 22 guage stranded (because then needed to be
flexible to connect to the control panel with the pots and leds, but the blue wires are either 18 or20 guage SOLID (it was too long ago to remember but it was the largest solid copper wire that will fit in the breadboard , whatever that is) which plug FIRMLY into a breadboard and do not come out that easily unless you pull on them. If you zoom in you will see the stranded white wires (with the little white labels) are soldered to the solid BLUE wires , resulting in a system that has flexible wires where needed and solid wires to plug into the breadboard. The guage of the standard arduino style jumper wires , are 22 guage and have a diameter of 0.635 mm
whereas 18 to 20 guage solid copper is 0.812mm to 1.024mm which makes a much 'snugger' fit in a breadboard, so the bottom line is that looking at
the breadboard is not the solution. The solution for a reliable connection is found by looking the the wire you are plugging into the breadboard and doing what is necessary to ensure a snug fit (as was done in the photo). I don't know how many wires there were in the circuit but it was two double wide breadboards full of ics and none of the wires came loose. (well , maybe one , momentarily , because I
inadvertently bumped it)

Using bigger wires makes for more reliable connections FOR THAT PROJECT, but will tend to deform the contacts some and thus make the board less reliable on subsequent projects :frowning:

Global Specialties - Homepage was one of the original suppliers of protoboards in te US (they were "Circuit Specialties" back then, I think) and used to have a pretty good reputation. I have no idea whether their boards are better than average these days, or whether they're importing the same contact strips as everyone else.

(Understand that it's a "hard" problem. For high quality sockets and connectors, it is "solved" by being fussy and specific about the size and nature of the things that plug into the socket.)

Using bigger wires makes for more reliable connections FOR THAT PROJECT, but will tend to deform the contacts some and thus make the board less reliable on subsequent projects :frowning:

When the pay for the event is $42,000, (Los Angeles Museum of Fine Arts Contemporary Art Council Awards Banquet 'Tribute 82' in Paramount Studios Sound Stage 13, with Leonard Nimoy and William Shatner as guest speakers) you can pretty much plan on throwing away the breadboard when the job is done.

For reliable breadboard, I design a PCB and order 3 copies of it from OSH Park.

K&H "advanced solderless breadboards" are good. Always select the sort with 6 contacts per strip, 5 is too little and frustrating to use especially once you have some 0.6" pitch breakouts to plug in. Always buy white breadboards, transparent or coloured make it much much harder to see what you are doing.

For example the AD-11:

Yes there are some hopelessly bad breadboards out there. Cheap usually guarantees cruddy ones.

I bought one from CSC when I was a teenager, that makes it at least 40 years old. It's a bit scruffy but it still works just fine. I've been promising myself a new one for years...

BillByrd:
At this particular moment in history, is there a breadboard brand at any price that works really well? By "well", I mean-- the wire-ends insert easily and hold firmly. It seems like a great business opportunity unless there's one already out there. Every one of mine fails this standard.

A lot of people have thought about this, and a lot of people have looked into this. That's for sure. The generic breadboards (the ones with the grids and holes) are ok for trial work, and relatively simple projects. You mainly have to make sure that the jumper wires are good (and working) ....... as I've seen quite a few jumper wires that are open-circuited - due to maybe poor quality control on the people that manufacturer/assemble them.

Thanks for all the responses. Before posting, I took a look at my settings because I never get an email notice about responses. I made a tweak or two, but still don't get them. Any suggestions?

I don’t think email notification has ever worked. Look in the website-and-forum area to find discussions about it.

"I don't think email notification has ever worked. "

That's embarrassing. This forum is all about coding and doesn't have one of the must-have features that forums about plumbing would have! What up with that?

BillByrd:
This forum is all about coding and doesn’t have one of the must-have features that forums about plumbing would have! What up with that?

I think it’s because this forum is generally about arduinos, and electronics involving arduinos, and software for working with arduinos.

These are the first cheap ones I’ve heard about that look like they might work:

Always select the sort with 6 contacts per strip

Heh. I had no idea that 6-contact breadboards even existed!
Note that there are multiple failure modes, sometimes in conflict with one another. I'd much rather have a "somewhat difficult to insert" board than one that was too loose and made flaky connections. Lifetime over multiple insertion cycles is yet another dimension...

MarkT:
K&H "advanced solderless breadboards" are good.

Agreed.

The AD series from K & H are the ones with 6 points per strip. I prefer the AD-100, AD-101, AD-102 and AD-4D. (The AD-101 is just AD-100 + AD-4D, the AD-102 is AD-100 + 2 X AD-4D). You can clip them together in any configuration that suits the project you are prototyping: lengthways, stacked, in a block etc., add extra supply rails or omit them where not needed.

K & H also have other breaboard ranges: RH and KH. They have only 5 points per strip and are not compatible with the AD range.

I used to but then from Maplin. Good to see that Rapid have my favourites in stock.

There's a good selection of what looks like good quality solderless breadboards here.:

https://www.rapidonline.com/breadboards?pdg=kwd-335240544:cmp-736256868:adg-42450425230:crv-298650831990:pos-2t3:dev-c&gclid=CjwKCAjwhbHlBRAMEiwAoDA34xCqFNqeZQnfovD6APjz2oGXbAjbnBjZCwk5AVUhbDNGkHPAJYXSlxoCUbYQAvD_BwE

I don't think the OP cares for "looking like good quality", but rather recommendations from
experience - of these the AD-11 and AD-13 are one's I can recommend from experience.

I have two of the BB830 breadboards by BusBoard Prototype Systems. They work quite well, but I haven't had them long enough to say anything about durability. The datasheet says they're good for 50K insertions. Arrow sells them for $7.84. There was a Youtube video on best breadboards, and this is one of two that passed the tests. The other one cost twice as much.

By the way, difficulty of insertion is no guarantee of good contacts. I recently threw away an Ebay breadboard that had very difficult insertions, but still had intermittent contacts. They must have spent many hours designing contacts that behaved like that.

MarkT:
I don't think the OP cares for "looking like good quality", but rather recommendations from
experience - of these the AD-11 and AD-13 are one's I can recommend from experience.

Well I didn't at first, but I have now ordered 2 of these:

K & H AD-102 Advanced Solderless Breadboard - 456 Tie Points | Rapid Online.

I have had some decent breadboards recently from Amazon, which were 840 tie points from elegoo, and were miles better than a noname sized board.

MorganS:
I don't think email notification has ever worked. Look in the website-and-forum area to find discussions about it.

You have to keep doing it until it takes, it seems.

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