how to interface arduino with website?

hello, my project requires me to control a water pump through a web site.i don't know how to do it. can any body help?

farhan7: hello, my project requires me to control a water pump through a web site.i don't know how to do it. can any body help?

Arduino can act as a webserver.

Your description sounds as if it can be managed like that - get an Arduino UNO - get an Ethernet Shield with W5100 chip on it - stack the Ethernet Shield on the UNO - get an Ethernet cable, plug one end into the Ehernet Shield and the other end to the LAN port of the router in your network - get a relay module and connect relay IN to some unused pin

Then you can upload a suitable webserver sketch to the Arduino and access it from a webbrowser

I think that I didn't post everything in detail earlier. I am using a Mega for my project. I have already interfaced a DHT sensor, moisture sensor, a GSM module, a servo motor, a water pump, LED screen and a ESP8266 module with it. My project is working as it should. Now, my supervisor wants me to introduce IOT in it. For that I need to create a website and be able to control the peripherals attached to the Mega from a mobile app or a website. I don't know how to write a mobile app or to write a website. Learnt some HTML and I made a makeshift website. So, now I have no idea how I write the code on the website to collect the data from the website and how to control the peripherals. Earlier I used to send the data to www.thingspeak.com but now my supervisor wants me to design a custom website for everything.

farhan7: I don't know how to write a mobile app or to write a website.

Neither is taught here.

Writing a mobile app is difficult.

I suggest that you concentrate on the other choice.

That's some supervisor you've got. Sounds alot like a professor I once had... always pushing me into things I knew nothing about, or so I thought.

Yeah… I am working on the website. I have 20 days to complete the project. I am done making the website but I have no idea how to design this website in a way that it accepts the data from my sensors. And how to write the code in a way that by just pressing a button on the website the motor would start or stop.

farhan7: Yeah.... I am working on the website. I have 20 days to complete the project. I am done making the website but I have no idea how to design this website in a way that it accepts the data from my sensors. And how to write the code in a way that by just pressing a button on the website the motor would start or stop.

There are so many tutorials about the esp8266 pushing data to a website or creating a start/stop button that I am suprised that you have not found a single tutorial.

farhan7: Yeah.... I am working on the website. I have 20 days to complete the project. I am done making the website but I have no idea how to design this website in a way that it accepts the data from my sensors. And how to write the code in a way that by just pressing a button on the website the motor would start or stop.

I'm not 100% clear on how this is attempting to be done? (or should be done?)

There are several ways to approach this..

The quickest/easiest (IMHO) would be to turn the ESP8266 into an AP & local web server at the same time.

(I have posted a complete project on this previous I'm pretty sure?)

The ESP8266 broadcasts' its own SSID...so on your phone you can see a new wi-fi network available.. (we'll call it class_project_wifi)

If you configure the ESP8266 module to be a captive portal (like you were at a hotel or something.. trying to use their wifi without paying/password..etc.. you are trapped into only being able to load their 'home/start/login' page)

Same approach here.. once you connect to the ESP wifi 'network'.. any attempt to open a browser and load a page will result in ONLY being server the HTML page you create.

This HTML page should then be a GUI/interface to command the Arduino to do 'whatever'.. ie: an HTML page of links/buttons.. hat when clicked submit the page..

the submitted page is then parsed, and the data/action is passed on to do whatever it is coded for.

If this need to be an IoT thing, that is accessible from outside your LAN.. you could then open up your router and forward the HTTP(s) traffic (on whatever port you want) over to the ESP module..

HTML is pretty EASY.. CSS is as well.. (more advanced CSS can be a bit tricky at times)....

What you really need is a nice serial communication platform/system to send a '1' to the MEGA, and have it return the TEMP.. or a '2' and have it return something else...etc.. than you can display things on the parse HTML page that is display after each submission..etc..

You can also log things to a database or use an MQTT broker/server (although that may be overkill, if everything you need is attached to the Arduino already)..

Thank You very much. It seems to be something that I can work with. Your help is appreciated.

You can check out my Beginner's guide to the ESP8266. It covers pretty much everything you need to know to get started with the ESP, like: - Connecting the hardware - Setting up a WiFi access point - Running a web server - Using the file system to store your web pages - Using buttons on the webpage to turn on/off pins on the ESP - Saving sensor data to the file system - Displaying sensor data on the web page or plot a graph - Creating a captive portal - ...

I didn't go into detail about writing the webpages themselves, but there's loads of HTML/CSS tutorials online, and you can check out the HTML/CSS/JS files I wrote for the examples.

You can use JavaScript and the WebSocket protocol for real-time communication between the web interface and the ESP8266. You could also use asynchronous GET requests to get the temperature data from the ESP. This means that your actual HTML file is sent to the browser without the temperature data in it. When the web page is loaded in your browser, a piece of JavaScript code is executed that requests the data from the ESP, waits for the response, and adds the response to the web page. This approach is used in the Data logging example of the guide. The advantage is that you don't have to change the HTML file on the ESP, you can just read it from the file system and send it to the browser directly.

Pieter

PieterP: You can check out my Beginner's guide to the ESP8266. It covers pretty much everything you need to know to get started with the ESP, like: - Connecting the hardware - Setting up a WiFi access point - Running a web server - Using the file system to store your web pages - Using buttons on the webpage to turn on/off pins on the ESP - Saving sensor data to the file system - Displaying sensor data on the web page or plot a graph - Creating a captive portal - ...

I didn't go into detail about writing the webpages themselves, but there's loads of HTML/CSS tutorials online, and you can check out the HTML/CSS/JS files I wrote for the examples.

You can use JavaScript and the WebSocket protocol for real-time communication between the web interface and the ESP8266. You could also use asynchronous GET requests to get the temperature data from the ESP. This means that your actual HTML file is sent to the browser without the temperature data in it. When the web page is loaded in your browser, a piece of JavaScript code is executed that requests the data from the ESP, waits for the response, and adds the response to the web page. This approach is used in the Data logging example of the guide. The advantage is that you don't have to change the HTML file on the ESP, you can just read it from the file system and send it to the browser directly.

Pieter

This is the most complete tutorial I have ever seen for the ESP8266! Great job!