How to wire USB-C connector to get 20V and 5 amp?

I ordered several USB-C connectors from AliExpress with just four solder pads on it. I will only use these for powering and not data transfer btw.

This is the connectors i ordered:

I have read that USB-C is good for up to 20V and 5 amp and i just wonder if i need to use all four solder pads or just "V" and "G" (ground)?

Do i have to use the two in the middle D+ and D- ?

Powering what?
If it is a computer then I don’t think it will like 20V.
If not it is a bit dangerous as it might get accidentally plugged into one.
You don’t have to make use of the D+ & D- lines, but if you do it makes a better connection with less contact resistance at the plug / socket interface. But it also increases the danger if the lead is ever misused.

Bjerknez:
I have read that USB-C is good for up to 20V and 5 amp and i just wonder if i need to use all four solder pads or just "V" and "G" (ground)?

It is vastly more complicated than that.

You need to read up on how USB-C works!

Bjerknez:
I ordered several USB-C connectors from AliExpress with just four solder pads on it. I will only use these for powering and not data transfer btw.

This is the connectors i ordered:

I have read that USB-C is good for up to 20V and 5 amp and i just wonder if i need to use all four solder pads or just "V" and "G" (ground)?

Do i have to use the two in the middle D+ and D- ?

If you are only going to use as a power connector with no data I would double up on the pins. Normally I buy a connector based on the intended application. I haven't a clue the current handling capacity of those connectors you posted. Anyway I would double up since it takes no effort of any amount. Then too, that would not be my connector of choice for 20 V 5 A.
Ron
Ron

Ron_Blain:
If you are only going to use as a power connector with no data I would double up on the pins.

If you examine that image, it would appear that all power pins are in fact, paralleled.

What puzzles me is that there are only seven connections per side, whereas USB-C defines 12 actual pins per side.

20 V/ 5 A - or indeed anything above 5 V, only happens if there is a chip in the connector.