Inverting vs non-inverting op-amp.

Dear all. In project I am building I have flexibility of both configurations to choose from. I was wondering abut practical aspect of both. I am aware that in non-inverting configuration my input impedance is equal to op-amp’s which is great advantage. However, I am assuming there are other factors that could be as important. Is there any aspect I should consider?

Hello,
Please read http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php/topic,148850.0.html then modify your post to include the information needed in order for us to know enough about your problem to be able to help you.

Is there any aspect I should consider?

Yes, does your design require the signal to be inverted? As we know nothing about what you are doing I can't imagine what else we can tell you.

In addition to reading and following the directions in "How to use this forum", please post a hand drawn circuit diagram (not Fritzing) of the device to which you intend to connect the op amp and the op amp configurations you are considering.

Also, state the requirements that the circuit must fulfill.

Wintermuteldn:
Dear all. In project I am building I have flexibility of both configurations to choose from. I was wondering abut practical aspect of both. I am aware that in non-inverting configuration my input impedance is equal to op-amp’s which is great advantage. However, I am assuming there are other factors that could be as important. Is there any aspect I should consider?

Well for low noise work there will be a difference in noise performance, a somewhat esoteric point.
inversion is sometimes inconvenient, although sometimes its useful, depending on what you are doing.
inverting mode can work with input voltages outside the supply.
inverting mode can be used for a current-summing audio mixer bus.
non-inverting mode is the only way to get ultra-high-impedance inputs for things like pH meters.
There is also a difference in large signal distortion IIRC, due to non-inverting mode having
potentially large common-mode swings on the inputs.
Ultra high speed opamps use current feedback and the inputs are very asymmetric, frequency
response depends on the mode.

What you should consider depends on what you are doing.

Dear all thank you replies and sorry for very vague question. So, I am making circuit to process signal in order to measure time delay. Schematic below shows analogue side of circuitry. So, as you can see, I have two stages of amplification. Here I have full flexibility of inverting/non-inverting arrangement. After initial testing it become apparent that 1 st stage does not have amplification of 100 it rather has amplification of 20. I forgot to include source impedance in my calculation which become clear after building 1 st prototype.
Here is my first question. My thinking is to change 1 st amplifier to non-inverting arrangement to minimalize effect of impute impedance on gain. Another worry of mine is that phase shifting might cause over all “positive” feedback. Would this approach be advisable for this circuit?
My second question is Would be any benefit of rearranging 2nd amplifier in to inverting circuit. As my understanding is that currently impute impedance does not influence circuitry that is connected to it.

Please post the signal characteristics of the various sources (voltage, frequency, impedance).

A single stage with a gain of 100 is going to lower your bandwidth substantially - much better
to make each stage have a gain of 10, then the bandwidth loss is about 7 times less.

Non-inverting input would be insensitive to the source impedance, yes, probably wise.

The inverting 2nd stage is a 2-pole bandpass filter? That's a stable configuration with the capacitor
in the feedback path so you don't have to worry about phase shifts affecting stability.

In the rectifying/envenlop detector portion below your 1st opamp is directly loaded by a 10nF
capacitor - that's not going to be a happy opamp (the diode, when forward biased, is a effectively
a short-circuit to ac). Perhaps you meant another resistor before that first capacitor?

Most opamps don't take kindly to direct capacitive load, that will affect stability...

Thank you all for reply! Taking in to consideration all suggestions posted I experimented with circuit and concluded that when I used non-inverting configuration my amplifier was too sensitive and picked random noise and amplified it with my signal (signal being at about 90mV to 120mV) this made my decision to go back to lower gain, higher input impedance inverting configuration.
@Matk.T Thank you for pointing flaw. Prior to this design output did not have LPF therefore I wanted to “connect the peaks” to smooth signal out. Following your suggestion, I added current limiting resistor and played with capacitor values in LTSpice. I absolutely did not notice it as circuit performed as expected till something would go with the smoke.
Yes it is second order RC filter.

Problem with spice emulation is that generally it won't tell you components are overloaded, and just
makes up arbitrary behaviour when outside the safe operating area of a device. It'll put 100A through
a 1 ohm 1/2 watt resistor without even blushing! I think some spices have support for maximum and
minimum error triggers though. "smoke analysis" is a search term for this.

I agree they have “normal” operation model. Same as a lot of CAD software works well within "small signal model” and when circuit was designed incorrectly and e.g. went into saturation region all different “amazing” things were happening. However, when built on breadboard it worked fine. Keeping that in mind I don’t know how much strain it put on components especially op-amp. Definitely worth changing.