is Arduino suitable for industrial use

Hello everyone,

i want to use Arduino for building a circuit which tests the connectivity between the points and accordingly actuates the pneumatic actuator. but the thing is the testing on the board will be on for like 10-15 hours daily.

What i want to know is

  1. Is Arduino suitable for industry standard ?
  2. Is it reliable to work rigorously?
  3. If NO what are my options ?
  4. which all displays i can connect easily to the arduino?
  5. How do i actuate a pneumatic actuator with it?

the application is pretty simple check the connectivity between the points show it on the screen and actuate the pneumatic actuator and repeat I know its a pretty basic question but still any help will be appreciated can anyone help.??

  1. Is Arduino suitable for industry standard ?

Yes, if you take care to provide appropriate voltage as input.

  1. Is it reliable to work rigorously?

As long as it gets all the union-negotiated coffee breaks, yes.

  1. If NO what are my options ?

Some other board.

  1. which all displays i can connect easily to the arduino?

You can connect anything to it with duct tape.

  1. How do i actuate a pneumatic actuator with it?

Use digitalWrite() to set a pin high. If you have to be asking this question, you are not ready to start using an Arduino.

udaymane25: Hello everyone,

i want to use Arduino for building a circuit which tests the connectivity between the points and accordingly actuates the pneumatic actuator. but the thing is the testing on the board will be on for like 10-15 hours daily.

What i want to know is

  1. Is Arduino suitable for industry standard ?
  2. Is it reliable to work rigorously?
  3. If NO what are my options ?
  4. which all displays i can connect easily to the arduino?
  5. How do i actuate a pneumatic actuator with it?

the application is pretty simple check the connectivity between the points show it on the screen and actuate the pneumatic actuator and repeat I know its a pretty basic question but still any help will be appreciated can anyone help.??

Depends of the industry, Id say avr is ok for industry but the uno board not.

maybe http://controllino.cc/ is the thing you're looking for

+1 for mart256

Arduinos are intended for experimentation and learning, often with breadboards and loose wires that eventually break if vibrated.

The boards are not protected against harsh, dirty or electrically noisy environments.

This sort of setup is unreliable, and not suitable for industrial operation.

a very solid differentiation has to be made between a physical thing like an Arduino UNO and the Arduino IDE.

the physical boards like the UNO, as jremington pointed our are NOT, in any way, compatible with any accepted industrial application. end of story.

however, adding a screw terminal shield to the UNO, does offer connections that would greatly enhance the connections and eliminate them from being an issue.

the other side the IDE, is just software and the chip is the same chip that can be found in vast numbers of industrial applications.

you asked some extraordinarily vague questions. what is 'industry standard' ? what is 'rigorously'' ? are you installing on a paint shaker ? on the wheel of a race car ?

3) options? "We can rebuild him. We have the technology. We can make him better than he was. Better, stronger, faster."

4) pass

5) pnuematic actuator

first off, what are you doing ? on/off, dithering?, analog control to maintain a constant from a PID signal of a every moving device ?

part of the answer lies in the form of a question. what is the loss if it fails ? what if it re-sets in the middle of a test? what if one wire breaks and it requires repairs ?

The simple answer from you is your answer to the question.

if you can suffer an occasional re-set, then you should use an Arduino.

if you are trying to use a pneumatic actuator for analog control, you need to add a pilot positioner of decent quality JCI-9502 or some such, not the N800-0555 POC.

the arduino has a pwm output that may be suitable for your needs, if they run analog.

this should be a different thread, along with links to data sheets and a reasonable accurate scope of operations.

Short answer: Intended purpose of the Arduino is as a toy, not as a tool.

The short answer is to use a suitable industrial PLC with the appropriate input, output modules and a display module. As for which one, that is a Ford/Chevrolet argument which I will not start.... Some manufacturers, in no preference order are: Allen Bradley, Automation Direct, Modicon. Square D, Siemens, and others depending on where in the world you are.

R

udaymane25: ....which board i should consider if not arduino??

If you read the replies carefully you should see that that is not the correct question.

What @rdfeil said is perfectly sensible - but probably expensive.

If you want an alternative there is no reason not to use Atmel microprocessors or the Arduino IDE for programming them. You just need to ensure that the microprocessor is part of a reliable circuit board with screw terminals or solder connections rather than the push-in connections on an Arduino Uno or Mega.

...R

Robin2:
You just need to ensure that the microprocessor is part of a reliable circuit board with screw terminals or solder connections rather than the push-in connections on an Arduino Uno or Mega.

In fact, the Pro Mini or Nano (or Pro Micro) are much more appropriate for “target” applications. Screw shields are available to socket them and would be quite firm, and you can either solder wires directly to the PCB, or install the pin strips and solder those to a mother PCB - which could be custom or could also be the screw shield.

udaymane25: Hello everyone,

i want to use Arduino for building a circuit which tests the connectivity between the points and accordingly actuates the pneumatic actuator. but the thing is the testing on the board will be on for like 10-15 hours daily.

What i want to know is

  1. Is Arduino suitable for industry standard ?
  2. Is it reliable to work rigorously?
  3. If NO what are my options ?
  4. which all displays i can connect easily to the arduino?
  5. How do i actuate a pneumatic actuator with it?

the application is pretty simple check the connectivity between the points show it on the screen and actuate the pneumatic actuator and repeat I know its a pretty basic question but still any help will be appreciated can anyone help.??

you have 6 questions, 1,2 and 3 are philosophical and have brought nothing of value. in point of fact, #1 is like asking if a vehicle that uses an engine is good for transporting stuff. leave out little things like eggs home from the store, 17 million socks from China or rocks from the moon. neither you nor anyone has yet posted what an 'arduino' is - board, concept or platform.

that brings you to the two more relevant questions, displays and application. seems neither you or anyone else wants to discuss those things, but would rather discuss philosophy.

ok, the same chip in the Arduino Uno/Nano/Mini is found in industrial robots. end of story. I highly suggest you close this thread and start a new one about pneumatics and do some googling about displays.

spend $100 on a NANO and that linked shield plus some parts. and get an Arduino running for your application and see if the software suits your ability and needs. then, your questions will be more technical. (useful)

as to question 6, yes, we are all here to help.

Semi interesting subject. Mostly philosophical _ what if... Maybe we need to hear from someone who uses this toy for real, not just for blinking LEDs.

And if this forum is of ANY indicator, I support "it is a toy" and I will add - under present " no direction " it will be a toy in foreseeable or near future, if any future.

Back to OP , sort off. Years back some authority ( military? do not recollect exactly ) tested "wire wrap" connection and compared them to soldered connections and screw-on connections. Guess which one "was better" - wire wrap! Worst - screw on! Soldered - so , so.

As always - industrial grade? - it depends.

Off the shelf hardware - considering the source - nope.

But SAM3X8E AKA Due is overlooked orphan by Arduino's ( both cc and org). Who needs Due to blink LED? ( That is getting old as an argument, I'll admit)

Cheers

PS My Due will eventually run couple of USB cameras doing moving object detection and recognition. Tracking model train - hence toy, again. .

As a developer in a company that builds industrial controllers I want to point out some differences between Arduino and "real" industrial controllers:

The arduino hardware consists more or less of a "naked" microcontroller with 3V3 or 5V GPIOs that are directly forwarded to the connectors for user experiments. On industrial controllers you can also find the same or similar microcontrollers but their GPIOs are never directly accessable. The GPIOs are always equipped with level conversation (like 24V) and with several protection circuits. For Inputs you normally have overvoltage protection, filters and hysteresis circuits against EMC disturbances like surge or burst. For outputs you have current amplication to drive currents of several Ampere and often also protection against overload and short circuit. All this helps the microcontroller to survive in an industrial environment.

Another difference is that industrial controllers have to be tested against several industry standards (IEC, IEEE) for EMC, electrical safety, environmental conditions, mechanical shock and vibrations and so on. A naked Arduino definitly wouldn't pass these tests.

So yes, in theory one could build an industrial controller USING an Arduino, provided that it is equipped with a "shield" as well as a mechanical enclosure that are appropriate to meet the above requirements, and to pass the industrial standard testing.

Simple industrial controllers (as already suggested) like a Siemens Logo start at € 100 - €150.

Wusaweki: As a developer in a company that builds industrial controllers I want to point out some differences between Arduino and "real" industrial controllers:

The arduino hardware consists more or less of a "naked" microcontroller with 3V3 or 5V GPIOs that are directly forwarded to the connectors for user experiments. On industrial controllers you can also find the same or similar microcontrollers but their GPIOs are never directly accessable. The GPIOs are always equipped with level conversation (like 24V) and with several protection circuits. For Inputs you normally have overvoltage protection, filters and hysteresis circuits against EMC disturbances like surge or burst. For outputs you have current amplication to drive currents of several Ampere and often also protection against overload and short circuit. All this helps the microcontroller to survive in an industrial environment.

Another difference is that industrial controllers have to be tested against several industry standards (IEC, IEEE) for EMC, electrical safety, environmental conditions, mechanical shock and vibrations and so on. A naked Arduino definitly wouldn't pass these tests.

So yes, in theory one could build an industrial controller USING an Arduino, provided that it is equipped with a "shield" as well as a mechanical enclosure that are appropriate to meet the above requirements, and to pass the industrial standard testing.

Simple industrial controllers (as already suggested) like a Siemens Logo start at € 100 - €150.

Very interesting, thanks for sharing.

Wusaweki: As a developer in a company that builds industrial controllers I want to point out some differences between Arduino and "real" industrial controllers:

The arduino hardware consists more or less of a "naked" microcontroller with 3V3 or 5V GPIOs that are directly forwarded to the connectors for user experiments. On industrial controllers you can also find the same or similar microcontrollers but their GPIOs are never directly accessable. The GPIOs are always equipped with level conversation (like 24V) and with several protection circuits. For Inputs you normally have overvoltage protection, filters and hysteresis circuits against EMC disturbances like surge or burst. For outputs you have current amplication to drive currents of several Ampere and often also protection against overload and short circuit. All this helps the microcontroller to survive in an industrial environment.

Another difference is that industrial controllers have to be tested against several industry standards (IEC, IEEE) for EMC, electrical safety, environmental conditions, mechanical shock and vibrations and so on. A naked Arduino definitly wouldn't pass these tests.

So yes, in theory one could build an industrial controller USING an Arduino, provided that it is equipped with a "shield" as well as a mechanical enclosure that are appropriate to meet the above requirements, and to pass the industrial standard testing.

Simple industrial controllers (as already suggested) like a Siemens Logo start at € 100 - €150.

Thanks. Since you mentioned industry standards and "Shields" - how does the nowadays very common "stacking using headers" connections fair as "industrial grade" connections?

Granted the whole hardware setup would not be directly exposed to moisture etc. but how about vibration, temperature changes etc.

Now little OT.

I have briefly worked with "down hole" AKA oil exploration hardware and the common environmental setup / protection was encapsulating the silly narrow ( 2 inches tops ) and very long ( I have seen 2 feet long ) PCB in practically irreparable( good for repeat business HA HA ) goop.

Most electrical failures were with "bypass capacitors". Unfortunately after mechanically removing the goop the caps grade ( mostly operating voltage , sometime temperature code / color ) were unreadable.

Needless to say - all components were soldered to the PCB,no CPU hardware / software of any kind was used. But things probably changed after 10 years.