Max. voltage and amps for Vin to handle + best way to supply power to Arduino ?

For my robotic projects, I generally use these 5V 1amp dc output power banks to supply power to my arduino and add external power supplies to supply power on the other extra electronic components; otherwise, I always encounter with lot's of energy consumes on the power supply, so the operation time always shortened unless I supply with an usb cable to arduino from my computer.

Other day, I had checking methods for a better way to supply power to arduino to operate my robot with a longer period. Thus, I have some questions about Vin.

I recently bought a new motor controller ( The Actobotics® Dual Motor Controller Assembled Actobotics® Dual Motor Controller - ServoCity) to try from servocity and this is the video how to use it Control Issues - Ep 7: The Actobotics® Dual Motor Controller - YouTube. The person there directly connects the power supply section to arduino's vin and ground and says "More amps better performance" and he is using a 11.1v 5.0 amps lipo battery.

I have 4.0 amps 11.1v and 6.0 amps 11.1v lipo batteries. So, if I supply power from these lipo batteries as connecting them to vin + ground section and if I supply my arduino modules like potentiometers, leds, servo etc, there will be no problem on my arduino itself and on these modules too,right ( without damaging or burning them ) ? thank you very much.

In addition, would you suggest me a nice long lasting power supply bank for Arduino to use please ? I really don't want robot to be stop within 10-15 minutes ( when building a wireless control robot ); because of lack of power. I will be very happy if you assist me about these questions, thank you.

You supply a voltage to the Arduino aka, the voltage has a maximum, the Arduino determines what the current draw will be (aka sets a minimum). So max current is infinite*.

And as the product page of the Arduino Uno tells you, the voltage for Vin needs to be between 6-20V but the recommend 7-12V. 12V is fine IF you don't connect external things to the 5V (or outputs) of the Arduino. Because at 12V the Arduino can't supply any significant current anymore.

As far as power source, we're missing details. I doubt the Arduino is the most power hungry device in your robot...

*Only limitation is what you find save for example in the case of a short. But you can limit that with a (poly)fuse.

septillion:
You supply a voltage to the Arduino aka, the voltage has a maximum, the Arduino determines what the current draw will be (aka sets a minimum). So max current is infinite*.

And as the product page of the Arduino Uno tells you, the voltage for Vin needs to be between 6-20V but the recommend 7-12V. 12V is fine IF you don't connect external things to the 5V (or outputs) of the Arduino. Because at 12V the Arduino can't supply any significant current anymore.

As far as power source, we're missing details. I doubt the Arduino is the most power hungry device in your robot...

*Only limitation is what you find save for example in the case of a short. But you can limit that with a (poly)fuse.

So while I supply my Arduino with my 6.0amps 11.1v Lipo Battery as connecting it to Vin+GND section, I still can supply my other electronic components who requires 3.3v and 5.0v without any problem (like without damaging and burning them), right ?

Yes Arduino doesn't consumes so much power; but what I connect on my arduino, lot's of components consumes too much power in my robotic tank project unfortunately. Thus, if I follow this method to power supply my arduino, my robot tank will be online much longer, right ? thank you.

This is the robotic tank project I had officially built and made demonstration in the university which I will make more modifications and additions to use on my final year robotic tank project now already.

So while I supply my Arduino with my 6.0amps 11.1v Lipo Battery as connecting it to Vin+GND section, I still can supply my other electronic components who requires 3.3v and 5.0v without any problem, right ? Yes Arduino doesn't consumes so much power but what I connect on it consumes too much power in my robotic tank project unfortunately.

MEKACI:
I still can supply my other electronic components who requires 3.3v and 5.0v without any problem (like without damaging and burning them), right ?

Yes, as long as hat 3.3V and 5V DON'T come from the Arduino :wink:

That was this part:

septillion:
12V is fine IF you don't connect external things to the 5V (or outputs) of the Arduino. Because at 12V the Arduino can't supply any significant current anymore.

I don't really get what's different about this than what you did before... But yeah, motors use quite some power. They are probably the bottleneck of how long you can run it. And of course, bigger battery (= more Wh) is longer runtime.

septillion:
Yes, as long as hat 3.3V and 5V DON'T come from the Arduino :wink:

Sorry for making to make lot's of confirmation friend. I only want to be sure one last time ( there are tons of cables on my project already and if I damage the arduino board or other things, it will be very hard to do everything from zero, it will consumes lot's of time to do it again ).

Shortly, you are saying me that "While my power supply unit (6.0amps 11.1v Lipo Battery) is connected to Arduino with Vin+GND, can I still supply my robot components as using Arduino board's 3.3v and 5v pins directly ( without damaging my components and arduino board ), right ? thank you very much.

No, I'm not. If you try to draw significant current from the Arduino (from 5V, 3,3V or an IO pin) while connected via Vin to a high voltage (like 11,1V) you will blow the voltage regulator on the Arduino. Get a/two separate (DC-DC step down) converter(s) to make an extra 5V (and 3,3V) rail.

But in this I do assume a standard Arduino like an Uno, Nano, Pro Mini or Mega.

Which Arduino (there are 10 or 12 different Arduinos) are you using?

MEKACI:
Shortly, you are saying me that "While my power supply unit (6.0amps 11.1v Lipo Battery) is connected to Arduino with Vin+GND, can I still supply my robot components as using Arduino board's 3.3v and 5v pins directly ( without damaging my components and Arduino board ), right ? thank you very much.

No, you can not use the 5 V and/ or 3.3 V pins on the Arduino board to power other components. That is - curiously enough - not what they are for. The reference on the Arduino description pages is somewhat misleading on this point.

You can get away with using the 5 V pin to supply just one or two devices requiring perhaps ten or so milliamps each, but it sounds as if the things you are talking about require substantially more, so you need to provide a 5 V "buck" converter to power them. And we would have to know exactly what things need 3.3 V before we can comment, but for example RF modules will require their own power supply also.

FWIW: maybe OP can see it in a diagram instead.

Basic Layout of power supply to MCU and actuators.

EDIT: diagram was insufficient

basically, the Arduino is not a/the power supply for the other components.

sometimes, there are modules that have a ("pass-thru" (?) my own terminology) 5V power line to supply to the MCU (microcontroller unit).

but, in most cases, actuators that draw a lot of power, usually get their power supply separate to the Arduino - all (for most beginner projects) Ground lines are connected though.

That image seems to suggest to connect both Vin and supply the 5V pin from a regulator. That's a bad idea...

On an Uno I would go for using the Vin. If you feed 5V to the 5V-pin it's a bad idea to use the USB... On a Nano / Pro Mini this isn't a problem.

septillion:
That image seems to suggest to connect both Vin and supply the 5V pin from a regulator. That's a bad idea...

good point - will edit and add an "OR"