Optical encoder pins and wiring

I have this optical encoder from a inkjet printer. I would like to use it with arduino. The VCC, VOA, VOB and GND are labeled on the PCB.

Question 1
I am not sure to which pins on the connector for the tape VCC, VOA, VOB and GND are actually connected?

Question 2
What about the other 2 remaining pins? Any Idea what they might be for?

Question 3
Is there a way to fin out what voltage should be supplied to VCC?

Question 4
Any idea what the second tape with 3 wires could be for? (It was connected somewhere to the bottom of the carriage caring ink cartridges) Can I just leave it with nothing connected to it if I want to get square A and B signals when I move the encoder?



witor:
I have this optical encoder from a inkjet printer. I would like to use it with arduino. The VCC, VOA, VOB and GND are labeled on the PCB.

Question 1
I am not sure to which pins on the connector for the tape VCC, VOA, VOB and GND are actually connected?

Question 2
What about the other 2 remaining pins? Any Idea what they might be for?

Question 3
Is there a way to fin out what voltage should be supplied to VCC?

Question 4
Any idea what the second tape with 3 wires could be for? (It was connected somewhere to the bottom of the carriage caring ink cartridges) Can I just leave it with nothing connected to it if I want to get square A and B signals when I move the encoder?

What you are calling "tape" are actually flexible printed circuits.

What is connected to what is easily determined by checking continuity with an Ohmmeter.

The voltage used should have been determined before removing from the printer, but now, start with 3 volts and see if the encoder works for you.

The other three pins probably tell the printer there is an ink cartridge in the carriage. Don't care connections.

Paul

What about the other 2 remaining pins? Any Idea what they might be for?

They may be for a LED that supplies light for the encoder (like a photo-interrupter).

I have connected it back to the printer main board and have measured voltage supplied to it. It is 3.3V

Is 3.3V enough to reliably trigger interupt on Arduino pro micro or should I try to convert the encoder to work with 5V?

Voltage across LED in the encoder module is 1.3V (diode is in series vith 130 ohm resistor). Replacing 130 ohm resistor with 320 ohm resistor should keep the diode current at 15mA and diode voltage at 1.3V.

The question is if the detector side of the encoder and the capacitor will survive 5V supply…

I have found a data sheet for a similarly looking encoder (see attached) module and it shows that it can be used with both 5 and 3.3 volts if correct resistors for the diode are used. Could this be general trend that those kind of modules generally accept both 3.3 and 5 V?

Avago-AEDS-9621#P10-datasheet.pdf (95.5 KB)