Portable Light Controlled DC Motor (12 Volts):

In the diagram below I’m attempting to get 6 amps and 9 volts to output on the multimeter when the LDR is exposed to light. When the LDR is exposed to light pin 10 outputs high voltage. The plan is to hook up 9 volt motor to the system which will be powered by the light resistor. I’m currently researching a transistor for this purpose would this be the correct approach? or is there a better method? If so what transistor model would you recommend? I will appreciate any help with this project.

Will you limit the activating light to a certain band, like near-IR for non-sunlit/indoor/night situations? Invisible to humans, it's used in security devices. IR leds and photodetectors are cheap if you shop a bit, but be sure to get the fast photo-transistor-based detectors (looks like a led with a black bulb, black filters out ordinary light), not LDR's.

Your picture has a number of unnamed components which makes it impossible to offer useful comments. And it doesn't seem to involve an Arduino.

But I wouldn't use either of those transistors. Depending on what exactly it is that's driving it I'd probably use a logic level MOSFET. There are thousands to choose from.

Steve

slipstick:
Your picture has a number of unnamed components which makes it impossible to offer useful comments. And it doesn't seem to involve an Arduino.

But I wouldn't use either of those transistors. Depending on what exactly it is that's driving it I'd probably use a logic level MOSFET. There are thousands to choose from.

Steve

The original project aimed to bypass the use of an arduino board with a focus on using logic gates.

The project has been updated to utilise an arduino board and code to modulate the LDR.

The general idea of the current project is:
(1): Read Light Resistor Values.
(2): If LDR Output is High output high on Pin 10.

The end goal is to output 6 amps and 9 volts from the battery when the conditions are met. I've been using a the unhooked multimeter in this simulation. Therefore, my question is if the MOSFET is the correct part to accomplish this task. If so what type of MOSFET?

Parts are:
RD3485 CdS.
1kΩ resistor.
9 Volt battery 6amps.

Next project will be to try and get the 12 volts to work:
1.5 (AA) x 12 batteries.

Any help on this task would be appreciated.

GoForSmoke:
Will you limit the activating light to a certain band, like near-IR for non-sunlit/indoor/night situations? Invisible to humans, it's used in security devices. IR leds and photodetectors are cheap if you shop a bit, but be sure to get the fast photo-transistor-based detectors (looks like a led with a black bulb, black filters out ordinary light), not LDR's.

Thanks for the tip. I've updated the project to avoid the use of logic gates by focusing on coding hence I've added an arduino board but will look out for those fast photo transistor detectors.

So your picture is not of what you're doing? So why are you wasting our time posting it?

What Arduino board are you using? What is your actual wiring diagram? And please post your code. And what is "an unhooked multimeter"? Generally a multimeter which isn't "hooked" to anything is just a paperweight.

Since you're using an LDR I guess you don't need rapid response but you will need to calibrate the output from the LDR to suit what you think of as "light" and "dark". What values are you reading from your LDR?

BTW 12V is 8 x AA batteries.] but most AA batteries won't deliver 6A if you really need that much current.

Steve

slipstick:
So your picture is not of what you're doing? So why are you wasting our time posting it?

What Arduino board are you using? What is your actual wiring diagram? And please post your code. And what is "an unhooked multimeter"? Generally a multimeter which isn't "hooked" to anything is just a paperweight.

Since you're using an LDR I guess you don't need rapid response but you will need to calibrate the output from the LDR to suit what you think of as "light" and "dark". What values are you reading from your LDR?

BTW 12V is 8 x AA batteries.] but most AA batteries won't deliver 6A if you really need that much current.

Steve

The picture in the orignal post was updated (Last Night) to reflect the changes.

Despite writing the post when falling asleep the fact that 1.5 * 8 = 12 volts instead of 1.5* 12 = 12 is an indicator of how far my intellect has fallen since taking a year off from university.

Sad emoji face.

Granted, I knew 1.5 * 8 batteries would produce a lot less current than a 9 volt battery. However, this is not an issue as they will both be used for different reasons.

9V "transistor" batteries don't produce so much current by design.

GoForSmoke:
9V "transistor" batteries don't produce so much current by design.

Correct both batteries would not be producing anywhere near the 6 amps.

Rather I was stating that 12 volt (8*1.5) produced less current then the 9 volt battery. Both of which would be under 1 amp of power. I believe the 12 volt is ~120 ma and the 9 volt is ~250-500 ma. Really it is tinkercard's fault they are the ones with data stating the current from a 9 volt battery was 6 amps.

In theory it is a simulator with perpetual power so who the hell knows.

I don't know what batteries you're using.

GoForSmoke:
I don't know what batteries you're using.

What is the max current I could draw from a 9V battery? - General Electronics - Arduino Forum

I see it is a whole debate about what you can draw from a battery. Wiki has the capacity listed as above > 1A. However, that is not the current you can draw from the battery. I've measured the current draw as either 120 ma and the same for the D battery using an ampmeter. I might be measuring the current incorrectly.

BJplusMilo21:
I see it is a whole debate about what you can draw from a battery. Wiki has the capacity listed as above > 1A. However, that is not the current you can draw from the battery. I've measured the current draw as either 120 ma and the same for the D battery using an ampmeter. I might be measuring the current incorrectly.

The discussion did include total battery amp hours and the idea of battery life as a measure of what is practical to draw but it did also get down to battery types and what you can pull from them. So alkaline, LiON, ni-cad, etc, are different.

Maybe charge a capacitor bank slowly (get more from battery) if you need short high current bursts.