Power arduino nano with lipo battery - recharging

Hello,
I am sorry I just could not really find a fitting headline...
My problem is the following: I want to embed an arduino somewhere and have it powered by a lipo battery like this one here
[/url]
I have seen that there are certain modules i can attach to the wires to make it rechargable via micro usb.
Is there any way i could embed the arduino and the battery once and never have to rewire again?
So is there any way to have the battery connected to the arduino but also have a charging port? Similar to a phones battery i guess.
Its no problem to just do the rewiring manually but I want to make a present and the person who will be gifted should be able to charge it in a simple manner.

If you have got any ideas I am very keen to hear them.
Thank you in advance!

To recharge try to use a dedicated chip, and with protection.

The TP4056 can be programmed to match the battery specification, charging current (A).

See too:

10 Dangerous Lipo Battery Mistakes - Fire and explosion causes

P.S.: The battery of the link you reported seems to already have a built-in protection board.

(Try to recharge with about 10 to 15% of the nominal capacity, if it is 1000mA, charge with 100 to 150mA, otherwise it is necessary to use temperature monitoring. The battery cannot get too hot.)

"So is there any way to have the battery connected to the arduino but also have a charging port? Similar to a phones battery i guess."

A cell phone charging battery pack might be your best choice. They have a low power shutoff, so you might need to add a 220 ohm resistor to the arduino as a dummy load.

You can use and embed an external module similar to the above.....

or you can take a look at some of the Adafruit boards (open source schematics) that have their li-po charging circuits built-in/on-board... and implement that into your project/design.

Alright thank you guys I think I am getting closer to the solution.
So with one of these TP4056 modules it is possible to connect the B pins to the battery and the out pins to the arduino. So like that I could keep it wired static like that and never have to rewire in order to charge, right?

However, isn’t it not possible to charge lipo batteries during use? Does the module recognise when it gets an input via micro usb and disables the output?

Thanks!!

"However, isn't it not possible to charge lipo batteries during use? Does the module recognise when it gets an input via micro usb and disables the output?"

You seem to keep fishing around for somebody to say "yes" to what you want. You might get a battery pack similar to the below that seems to have a ready made charging setup and separate wires for power and charging. Might be better than a DIY setup.

https://www.ebay.com/itm/2x-7-4V-1500mAh-18650-Battery-Pack-W-T-Plug-USB-Charger-for-WLtoys-12428-BC922/173948594176?

I thought that is what the output contacts on the TP4056 were for.
But I might look into these battery packs, it’s just that I need kind of small proportions and 3.7V.
Thats why these lipo ones seemed fitting at first

LeonKareemL:
I thought that is what the output contacts on the TP4056 were for.
But I might look into these battery packs, it’s just that I need kind of small proportions and 3.7V.
Thats why these lipo ones seemed fitting at first

On ebay there appear to be single 18650 battery recharger cases that have both input and output USB jacks. These DIY cases are made to open to put the battery in, which should allow access to the ends of the battery to tap off the 3.7v. I think the low end price on the cases may be around $1.

There seems to be some fuzziness about what you’re trying to do. If your Arduino is a 3.3V model, then you can run it at 8 MHz on a single Lipo cell. If you want to use a 5V Arduino running at 16 MHz, then things get more complicated. For that you would also need a boost converter to get from the nominal 3.7V battery voltage up to 5V. You could also use two Lipos in series to get 7.4V, but then charging becomes much more complicated.

The question of running the device while charging the battery depends on how much current the device draws. A TP4056 module will turn off charging when the charge current drops to 10% of the full charge current (as set by the resistor value). If your Arduino draws less than that 10% amount, then the charger will eventually turn off as it should. But if the device draws more than the 10% amount, then charging would never terminate, and eventually the battery might catch fire or explode. So you would have to set the charging resistor to a value that works for the Lipo, and that gives you a 10% value that’s higher than the device current.

You can add what’s called a Load Sharing circuit that eliminates this 10% issue. It consists of a P-channel mosfet, a diode, and a resistor. Attached is a samplpe circuit with load sharing and a boost converter.

In my experience, power packs don’t allow operating the device while they are being charged, and they shut down automatically unless current stays above a certain level, which can be a waste of battery power.

Below is one of the single battery boxes that might provide easy access to the ends of the battery.

https://www.ebay.com/itm/Backup-External-USB-Power-Bank-Battery-Charger-DIY-18650-Case-Box-for-Cell-Phone/291793872612?