Problems powering Arduino Nano trough VIN pin using 9V DC adapter

Hi to all.
I am having problems powering an Arduino Nano using a 9V wall adapter using the VIN pin. The arduino has the following components:

  • 2 LEDs
  • 3 pin buzzer module
  • relay module
  • push button switch

I have programmed a series of actions upon pushing the button: power the LEDs, activate the relay and play a buzzer sound. Everything works correctly while it is powered using the standard USB cable, however it works erratically and no sound is emitted when the Arduino is powered using the VIN pin. I have verified the output voltage is correct using a multimeter. The adapter output is rated to 1 amp.

I am attaching a photo of the Arduino and its components. I would greatly appreciate any feedback regarding this issue.

Try using a different breadboard. I suspect you have connections problems.

Paul

Paul_KD7HB:
Try using a different breadboard. I suspect you have connections problems.

Paul

Thanks for the feedback. After the photo was taken i soldered the component wires directly to the arduino board and the issue persists. I have checked the continuity of the wires and they appear to work fine. One thing i noticed is that if the buzzer is disconnected the system works fine. Perhaps that buzzer is draining more voltage than the regulator is able to provide?

The adapter output is rated to 1 amp.

Yeah but not the on-board 5V regulator. The higher the voltage at Vin, the less current you have available.
I'm quite sure a 7.5V adapter would work fine. (note that the 9V adapter could output 11-12V unless fully loaded)
Alternatively, you could power the relay separately.

Note: Its the relay draining most of the power ... the buzzer failing to work is just a symptom.
As a test, try disconnecting the relay or turning it off in your code (have your earmuffs handy).

dlloyd:
Yeah but not the on-board 5V regulator. The higher the voltage at Vin, the less current you have available.
I'm quite sure a 7.5V adapter would work fine. (note that the 9V adapter could output 11-12V unless fully loaded)
Alternatively, you could power the relay separately.

Note: Its the relay draining most of the power ... the buzzer failing to work is just a symptom.
(as a test, try disconnecting the relay or turning it off in your code).

Thank you for the feedback, it makes sense. Will try another power supply as a test and also disconnecting the relay and see what happens.

A 5V PSU would be better...

A 5V PSU would be better...

Agreed ... and a sure thing! +1

PerryBebbington:
A 5V PSU would be better...

In that case it would be safe to wire the 5V leads of a 5V adapter to the 5V PIN on the arduino? I will try taking apart a cheap phone charger and wiring its output directly to the Arduino board. I am looking for a smaller foorprint than using a USB cable/connectors.

In that case it would be safe to wire the 5V leads of a 5V adapter to the 5V PIN on the Arduino?

Perfectly safe, that's what it's for (well, one reason anyway).

I suggest you start collecting old power supplies from discarded electronics, that way you will always have a power supply for anything you make.

PerryBebbington:
Perfectly safe, that's what it's for (well, one reason anyway).

I suggest you start collecting old power supplies from discarded electronics, that way you will always have a power supply for anything you make.

Thanks alot for your feedback PerryBebbington! :slight_smile:

esquirish:
In that case it would be safe to wire the 5V leads of a 5V adapter to the 5V PIN on the arduino? I will try taking apart a cheap phone charger and wiring its output directly to the Arduino board. I am looking for a smaller foorprint than using a USB cable/connectors.

Just cut the connector off the far end of the charger wire. Strip a bit of insulation off each of the two wires. I hope you know how to solder! The wires should by color coded or marked to show the + and the - wires. Check with your multimeter.
Paul

Paul_KD7HB:
Just cut the connector off the far end of the charger wire. Strip a bit of insulation off each of the two wires. I hope you know how to solder! The wires should by color coded or marked to show the + and the - wires. Check with your multimeter.
Paul

Will do that, thatnks for your input. Will report my findings when new adapter is tested.
Cheers