TP4056 chagre current on oscilloscope

Am new to the Arduino and have been using it to help me learn about my new oscilloscope. I have made a few led flashers and monitored the output on the scope. I don’t have much in components other than a few capacitors, resistors, Led’s that came with the board. Could someone maybe suggest a good startup kit that comes with the needed components to learn Arduino with.

I just stumbled across a message regarding charging Li-Ion batteries using a TP4056, I thought this forum was just Arduino but apparently not so I’d like to ask the following

I saw an old video where the person was using a scope to monitor the charging current. In the video I’m gathering he was using an older version of the tp4056 without the built in protection circuits. I have the newer version and would really like to duplicate what he did as a learning experience. Am attaching a pic of my 4056 board. TIA

4056.jpg

For the Arduino part, just get one of the many starter kits out there. Any that catches your fancy will do to get started. It'll get you a bunch of sensors to play with, get a feel for what it can do.

But an even better way to get started would be: find yourself an interesting, not too complex project, get the components needed for that, and go from there.

You can use a PWM pin on almost any Arduino and a simple RC filter to create all kinds of signals to monitor with your oscilloscope. You can even draw pictures.

Just got my first O-scope as well.
I'm gonna build one of these. arduino waveform generator
Which scope did you get?

I have the Siglent sds1102CML+ 100mhz. Didn't go crazy getting the biggest and baddest as I have only the slightest clue how to use one but I always wanted to learn.

That why I was looking at the TP4056 charge current as it's something I thought I could duplicate and learn from.

Hutkikz:
Just got my first O-scope as well.
I'm gonna build one of these. arduino waveform generator
Which scope did you get?

Nice! I have the Siglent sds-1104x-e and am learning myself. which is why I'm building a waveform generator.

But I did not see an actual question. a link to the video would be good also.

Not sure if I mentioned it but haven't done any electronics in 40 years but I remember RC filters. Need to get a few parts, maybe one of those arduino kits instead of individual components?

Klaus_K:
You can use a PWM pin on almost any Arduino and a simple RC filter to create all kinds of signals to monitor with your oscilloscope. You can even draw pictures.

It wasn't in the form of a question, but here it is and I'll find the video link.

"I saw an old video where the person was using a scope to monitor the charging current. In the video I'm gathering he was using an older version of the tp4056 without the built in protection circuits. I have the newer version and would really like to duplicate what he did as a learning experience. Am attaching a pic of my 4056 board."
Charging a Lithium 18650 Cell using the TP4056 - YouTube --tp4056 hooked to scope showing current draw

BTW: how do I get the board to tell me when someone responds to a message. most others send an email!

Hutkikz:
Nice! I have the Siglent sds-1104x-e and am learning myself. which is why I'm building a waveform generator.

But I did not see an actual question. a link to the video would be good also.

Same here but I picked it up again a couple yrs. back.
The kits are a good way to get an assortment of parts to get started with.
The wave form generators i linked basically are RC filtered pwm but the code to produce the waveforms is already complete.

BTW: how do I get the board to tell me when someone responds to a message. most others send an email!

click the "Receive Alerts" button at the bottom right of the last post.

I'll have a look at the video.

Are you asking where to connect the probe?
If you look at the board in the video you can see the trace he connected to leads directly to pin 2 of the tp4056. It’s hard to see in your pic but it looks like the left side of r3 is where you want to connect on your board or just connect directly to pin 2.

I thought that was it but wanted to be sure. I figure on soldering a short stiff lead there to clip onto instead of trying to hold the probe there while adjusting things and waiting.

Hutkikz:
Are you asking where to connect the probe?
If you look at the board in the video you can see the trace he connected to leads directly to pin 2 of the tp4056. It's hard to see in your pic but it looks like the left side of r3 is where you want to connect on your board or just connect directly to pin 2.

I believe that's why he connected to the resistor. It's safer than soldering to the IC.

I tried probing the resistor and didn't get a reading. Maybe the have a coating over it. Will try again!

From the TP4056 datasheet, pin 2 (PROG) determines the charge setting with a resistor to ground. It gives the formula IBAT = VPROG / RPROG x 1200 where IBAT is the current to the battery, VPROG is the voltage across the program resistor connected to Pin 2, and RPROG is the program resistor.

So you use the oscilloscope to measure voltage across RPROG and apply the formula.

Hutkikz:
Same here but I picked it up again a couple yrs. back.
The kits are a good way to get an assortment of parts to get started with.
The wave form generators i linked basically are RC filtered pwm but the code to produce the waveforms is already complete.
click the "Receive Alerts" button at the bottom right of the last post.

I'll have a look at the video.

I took your advice and threw together the sinewave generator and viewed it on the scope. looks sine to me!

Sine, sine everywhere a sine. Do this, don't do that. Can't you read the sine!! 8)

Simple guide for inserting images in a post

I know it's no big feet for most, but at least I figured it out. Maybe you can teach an old dog new tricks. nice reference to Five man electrical band!!!!

Hey, This old dog is learning too!
I thought it was the perfect referance since it is sung by both the Five man electrical band and Tesla!!!

Ok, either am losing my mind or the gremlins are at it again.

Went into practice this the scope and connected it to the Arduino sinewave generator. Well, I was getting the weirdest signal on the scope, It was the same sinewave but it was thick.

After 30 or so minutes I decided to check the components. The capacitor was fine but the resistor showed 1kohm instead of 10kohm. So much for old dogs!!!! :o