USB Oscilloscope Advice Desired

I'm considering investing in a usb oscilloscope. I'd be using it for applications such as measuring current, viewing pwm signals, etc. Is there a preferred manufacturer(s) for this type of device. Any particular specifications I should be keeping an eye out for? Thank you for your time. Below is a picture of a corgi being attacked by a plush squid.

What is the budget ?

They can be cheap, you can make one with a Arduino board. They can be expensive. They can even be found on kickstarter.com.

Do some research on USB logic analyzer, it may be all that you need.
Example: Logic Analyzers from Saleae - #1 with Professional Engineers

I'd be using it for applications such as measuring current

Use a DVM.

Caltoa:
What is the budget ?

They can be cheap, you can make one with a Arduino board. They can be expensive. They can even be found on kickstarter.com.

300 USD tops

jonhatespizza:
300 USD tops

For $350 you can get a non-USB Rigol with significantly more sample rate, memory depth, performance, and real-actual knobs versus a limited USB-based scope.

This question comes up almost once a month on this forum. And probably everyday on other forums. A little bit of searching instead of posting unrelated pictures will get you far.

Caltoa:
They can be cheap, you can make one with a Arduino board. They can be expensive. They can even be found on kickstarter.com.

It's a joke ?
Read the data-sheet ! With 10 bits resolution ADC max sample rate is only 15ksample/s.
Due to Nyquist/Shannon theorem max frequency is 7.5 kHz.
BUT at 7kHz you have only ONE point per period.
Remember to be able to see a rectangular signal at "F" Hz your bandpass have to be 10 time more higher -> see "Fourier series"

I have an USB HANTEk 6082BE given for 80MHz bandpass.
Other Hantek model exist like DSO series with higher "announced bandpass" but I have doubts about announced performances.

HANTEk 6082BE give me total satisfaction with board working at 16 MHz like Arduino UNO and Mega.

If I could only have one scope, I would make it a bench scope. The current benchtop DSOs like Rigol, Hantek, and others are small compared to the CRT scopes I used to have to carry around, and with larger screens.

Look for a sample rate 10x the bandwidth. Nyquist/Shannon is NOT a recommendation, it is a limit that says you’ll see in-band aliasing if you do not limit bandwidth to 1/2 the sampling frequency. It does NOT say anything about the fidelity of the capture.

When I can buy a USB scope with 1Gsps dual channel 100MHz bandwidth, I’ll buy it.

FYI, those DSO203 pocket scopes being sold as “72MHz analog bandwidth”? They are 36Msps per channel, 4MHz analog bandwidth. Yes, all the ads lie. There is a lowpass filter on the last Op Amp, single pole with -3dB point at 4.4MHz. Take into account stray circuit capacitance and other stages in the circuit, I’d call it 4MHz. That’s just about right for 36Msps.

I consider that just about right for a scope for audio work and digital signals <100kHz.

Joke or no joke, this could be a project that is fun to build:

This one promises 100MS/s, but it might take some time before you have it:

Sometimes I use my computer’s audio input with Audacity as a scope. That is the cheapest solution. Audacity has also many filters.

My review of the DSO 203, based on the seller claiming 72MHz analog bandwidth:

http://www.amazon.com/SainSmart-DSO203-Portable-Oscilloscope-Bandwidth/product-reviews/B0057M7YLE/ref=cm_cr_pr_hist_1?ie=UTF8&filterBy=addOneStar&showViewpoints=0&sortBy=bySubmissionDateDescending