Warm water

Hi. i have a doubt. How i warm water? I'm building a coffee maker and i need ward water for cappuccino.

Thanks!

http://www.ebay.com/sch/i.html?_nkw=immersion+heater+coffee

Thanks Fungus!

For cappuccino, you need not only heat but pressure as well. Cafe espresso, which forms the base of cappuccino, is brewed with the hot water pressed through the grounds under pressure, and the correct amount of pressure is crucial to a good brew. In addition, to steam the milk you need steam under a certain amount of pressure.

In early machines (and some modern ones), the pressure is provided manually, by pulling down on an arm (which requires a lot of skill to get the right amount of pressure). Most modern machines use a pump. Either way, just heating the water isn't enough for cappuccino (or any other espresso-based brew.

(I don't know much about electronics, but I do know something about coffee.)

Good luck, and enjoy your beverage!

Rob Rothman

Hi, you can now get, horror, instant cappuccino. Sacrilege. A powder with all the ingedients.

Not like a real cappuccino...

Tom.....I wouldn't mind one now, but it sleepy bo's bo's time..... :)

A dangerous-but-traditional way is to use Electric Heating Elements ; they use (usually) AC current (DANGEROUS) and heat up : similar to soldering irons , irons (the house device , not the material) , hairdryers and similar devices that do produce heat but don't need any sort of fuel . It's easy to 'put' the element inside where water heats , and you'd get something like 300-400 C in like 2-3 minutes , but that's VERY DANGEROUS as 'touching' your cappuccino means a 220V shock . So you might want to place the element out of the water tank . Or use other methods (second option is better :grin: )

Arman5592: It's easy to 'put' the element inside where water heats , and you'd get something like 300-400 C in like 2-3 minutes , but that's VERY DANGEROUS as 'touching' your cappuccino means a 220V shock . So you might want to place the element out of the water tank . Or use other methods (second option is better :grin: )

I assume the ones I linked to in reply #1 are isolated. :D

Some of them are also 12V, which seems a lot safer then AC mains (although they might take longer to heat the coffee).

Even a 12v DC shock is bad . As a general rule , if you’re using heating elements , don’t put it in the water , put it outside the place water is and place a heat conductive sheet of material that does not conduct electricity and does not burn . Tungsten with multiple layers of paint should work .

Arman5592: As a general rule , if you're using heating elements , don't put it in the water

The ones I linked to are designed to be put in water (directly in your cup!)

So I guess they have some sort of cover which doesn't conduct electricity , or other safety methods . Perhaps a "don't touch this" sign XD

Arman5592:
So I guess they have some sort of cover which doesn’t conduct electricity , or other safety methods . Perhaps a “don’t touch this” sign XD

I don’t think even the Chinese would sell something that puts 220V AC directly into a cup of water in your hand.

But even 9v is irritating ! (Based on the test of put-a-9v-battery-on-your-tongue )

Heating elements are designed in the following manner - which is why they don't electrocute you (otherwise, you'd be dead from taking a shower with hot water from your electric water heater):

Basically, such heating elements consist of a coil of nichrome wire, surrounded by a compacted layer of magnesium oxide as an electrical insulator, which is then surrounded by a steel or other metal sheath. The nichrome wire is connected to terminals which are passed through ceramic or similar non-conductive, high-temperature resistance supports. All of this serves to insulate the metal sheath (which glows red-hot) from the current being carried by the nichrome wire. The metal sheath is what comes into contact with the water or metal (such as on a stove); ever wonder why a skillet didn't short out your stove? Now you know...

http://www.wattco.com/files/uploaded/image_upload_55.jpg

You could have a separate reservoir for the water. This would have a separate float valve permanently plumbed into the mains water. Submerged below the water line you could have some rods constructed from titanium steel with holes drilled to make them porous. Each of these rods would have a core of enriched uranium. Between these rods you would have a matrix of graphite sheets. If these were mounted onto a platform above the tank, when you require hot water, all you need to do is raise this platform.

You should ensure, however, that you have some kind of measures to prevent the graphite sheilding being raised too far as this could cause the system to go critical. You should also implement a policy of keeping persons of child bearing age away from your coffee maker unless they are wearing lead underwear. (you can never be too careful)

Can interest you in anice cup of teea ?

Hi you need what is called an IMMERSION HEATER they are designed as cr0sh has pointed out.

All baristas have these coils so that you can dispense while heating.

The common electric kettle is now an immersion heater type.

Gunna show my age now. The really old types were ceramic jugs with bakelite flip type lid, the element was an open nichrome wire around a ceramic former, it hung in the jug on its power supply wires. The flip lid could not be opened until the power cord was removed from the jug.

Tom...... :)

http://www.vintageshops.com.au/2013/06/down-to-earth-vintage-shops-sydney/ about halfway down the page, vintage electric jugs, ohhh I feel soooo old.....

fungus:

Arman5592: So I guess they have some sort of cover which doesn't conduct electricity , or other safety methods . Perhaps a "don't touch this" sign XD

I don't think even the Chinese would sell something that puts 220V AC directly into a cup of water in your hand.

No but we would. Once saw a 3 phase heater for water. Three prongs in the water !!!! Im not kidding.

Boardburner2:

fungus:

Arman5592: So I guess they have some sort of cover which doesn't conduct electricity , or other safety methods . Perhaps a "don't touch this" sign XD

I don't think even the Chinese would sell something that puts 220V AC directly into a cup of water in your hand.

No but we would. Once saw a 3 phase heater for water. Three prongs in the water !!!! Im not kidding.

Not even a "dont-touch-this" sign ?!

It had been disconnected in th 50s. Still scary to look at though.