Working in Cloned UNO and not in original

I used to work with cloned UNO board and my project is finished. Now my problem is, I upload the same code to the original Arduino UNO and it was not working. Then the original UNO is heating heavily if I connect power from external source(1.3AH lead acid battery). In cloned, the IC CP2102 alone heating. In original, 2sq CM area from the external power plugging port is heating.

Again in the cloned board the code runs only once. Then I remove all connections and plug it again, it was not working. Again I need to upload the code to execute the project. I am unable to figure out what is the problem?

In cloned board only 3 analog output pins are available. I need four pins to control motor speed. How could I do this? In original it has 6pins but my project refused to run in it. Suggest a solution.

Thanks in Advance.!!

You might have not only one, but two or three problems.

Disconnect everything from the Arduino board (clone or original), connect the usb plug and run a led blink sketch or so. It should not get warm. Connecting a power supply to the power jack should still be okay.

Do you use a 12V battery to the power jack or 6V battery ? The 12V might be too high (voltage regulator could get hot). The 6V could be too low (two power sources fighting over the voltage).

If not all analog input are working, then the board might be damaged. If a few pins are damaged, perhaps more on the board is damaged.

If you want to get an answer to your problem in the quickest manner, you need to do the following:

  • Tell us (or give links) what kind/cpu/etc each Arduino is.
  • Take a high-quality picture of each Arduino and how it is hooked up to your circuit.
  • Indicate on each picture (an arrow, maybe) where the heating is happening.
  • Post a schematic of the circuit and how it is connected to the Arduino.
  • Post your code.
    Anything less will only lead us to speculation, which may or may not help solve your problem.

Peter_n: The 12V might be too high (voltage regulator could get hot). The 6V could be too low (two power sources fighting over the voltage).

The original arduino boards have 1117-5.0 type of regulators that can handle 12V. They get pretty warm but the regulators are good and there is enough copper to dissipate heat. The newer ones starting around the last quarter or so in 2014, crappy regulators with a backward C marking have been installed on official arduinos. I only have mega2560 and wireless shields (crappy regulators replaced 1117-3.3). If you supply 12V, they heat up and break down. No outputs!

The OP may have many issues but I just want to let OP know it could be the power supply too. Maybe OP was using USB to power the system and now using a 12V battery.

I’m using PC of hp with i3 processor.

Arduino UNO is the original board. Cloned is UNO Atmega 8.

Code is below,

void loop() {
     sensor();
 
 if(b>20 || d>20)
 {
    if(Serial.available()>0)// || r)    
   { 
     //char sr;
     Serial.print("serial IN ");

     sr= Serial.read();
     //ab=sr;
     if(b>40)
     {
       if(sr==48)
       {
         applybreak();
       }
       else if(sr==49)
       {
         forward();
       }
       else if(d>40 && sr==50)
       {
       backward();
       }
       else if(sr==51)
       {
         left();
       }
       else if(sr==52)
       {
         right();
       }
       else
       {
        applybreak(); 
       }
     }
   }
     
  //   if(d>40 && sr==50)
 //    {
 //      backward();
     
//        else if(sr==48)
//        {
//          applybreak();
//        }
   
    // }
   //}
   else
   {
     
     Serial.println(" Serial Error...");
     Serial.print("serial ");
     Serial.print(sr);
     digitalWrite(error,HIGH);
     //sensor();
   }
 }
 else
 {
  Serial.println("Clear the Road to Travel");
  digitalWrite(error,HIGH);
  //sensor();
 }

}

void sensor()
{
//2 sensor code

}
void forward()
{

}
....

This is the area the board is getting heated (Circled).

Using 12V to the power jack, and requiring more than a little current from the 5V, that could heat up the voltage regulator. That voltage regulator is next to the power jack.

I can think of a few things:
1 ) The Bluetooth and sensors require current, and the voltage regulator is getting hot. You better use a power supply of 7.5V or the DC-DC converter to lower the 12V.
2 ) The power jack could be bad. Perhaps a tiny shortcut or bad contact.
3 ) Using the 6V battery causes another problem. That voltage is too low, and the USB power is not switched off. Current from the battery flows into the computer, heating everything in its path.
4 ) Something is broken on the Uno board, or a clone Uno has a bad designed board.

Just a few points.

  • You have posted here a few times. You should know how to post code (not that the code should be responsible for heating of components if the circuit is correctly assembled). Please go back and mark your code up in your previous post with "code" tags so that we can check it.
  • What exactly do you mean by a "clone" board?
  • How would a UNO have an ATmegaA8 on it?
  • A photo of your assembly would be relevant.
  • You are using a motor shield? Or just a module? A shield would be mounted on top of the UNO.
  • There is some confusion about what battery voltages you used, and your drawing has over-printing on one battery. Please clarify that they are in fact, both 12V batteries and always were?
  • A simple way to drop 12V to a more comfortable voltage for the UNO is to put a string of five 1N4004 diodes in series with it. A much more efficient and reliable way is to obtain a 12V to 5V switchmode converter and feed the whole 5V rail from it.

Using the 6V battery causes another problem. That voltage is too low, and the USB power is not switched off. Current from the battery flows into the computer, heating everything in its path.

Current flow from battery to PC?

The clone board is bought from local market. I has mounted with Atmega8A chip on it.

Attached the connection photo with this thread.

I am using the motor shield and it was not mounted on top of the UNO.

Thanks for the photo. I can't tell if the 5V Arduino pin is somehow used for the motor driver. I assume that the motors have a seperate 12V battery.

When the Arduino is powered with 6V to the power jack, and the usb cable is connected, and the computer is turned off, then the current from the battery will flow into the computer.

Can you tell me the marking on the original UNO’s voltage regulator? It is a small black rectangle with one wide tab on one wide side and 3 pins on the other wide side. Here is a picture what it is. I’ve circled it for you.

ArduinoUno_R3_Front_regulator_circled.png