Arduino Header Cables 2F to 1F

Hey,

I hope someone will be able to help solve this problem. There are jumper cables for the Arduino that are 1F to 1F, but I was wondering if there is a cable that is 2F to 1F. I want to connect two male power pins together that are in the same vicinity and make the one wire total instead of two different wires.

So a wire that has 2 heads and 1 ending that is female.

If you are intending to do much with the Arduino then you might want to consider investing in the 'DuPont' style connectors. You buy the header shells and crimp sockets and pins, and a crimping tool, and then you can assemble any cable you want. Within reason of course!

mfad:
Hey,

I hope someone will be able to help solve this problem. There are jumper cables for the Arduino that are 1F to 1F, but I was wondering if there is a cable that is 2F to 1F. I want to connect two male power pins together that are in the same vicinity and make the one wire total instead of two different wires.

So a wire that has 2 heads and 1 ending that is female.

Here is the best way for me… That’s how i do it in my projects too…
Take a look at the image attached !!!

1.jpg

I suspect most of us just slice wire in the middle, and connect what we need, using solder to make a permanent connection, and putting heat shrink material around the joint and shrink it like zaxarias's post.

But if you are still a solder newbie, you can get cold splice wire taps that allow you to connect cables without soldering (you do need to use enough force to do the splice with large pliers). Adafruit sells these: https://www.adafruit.com/products/1494, but you probably can find similar things elsewhere. Note, you want to buy splices for the size of wire you are using. The Adafruit version can do 22-26 gauge wire, which typically matches what most people use.

Alternatively, if it is power or ground wires, you can use standard breadboards, and they have red/black columns that allow you to plug in separate wires to the board. Even if they aren't power/ground wires, you can plug up to 5 wires into a row on the breadboard, and they are are connected. You do have to make sure sure if you are driving signals through the wires, that the total current is less than or equal to the amount the microprocessor can send through a given signal pin. Here is a tutorial on breadboards: https://learn.sparkfun.com/tutorials/how-to-use-a-breadboard

If you want to start making your own wire that are custom sized, you can get crimp connectors that you can attach to stranded wire. I've used the connectors from Pololu.com: http://www.pololu.com/category/39/cables-and-wire. I find crimping the female end on a little challenging with just needle nose pliers, and one of these days I need to get a proper crimping tool.