Bill of Material of some common comonents?

Hi everyone

I'm new to the arduino world and I think of buying a starter kit. Since it is quite expensive and many of the components I might not use at all, I was wondering if there are some bill of materials around with some common electrical components such as diodes, switches, MOSFETs, resistors, op Amps, LEDs, jumper cables, H-bridges etc. ?

Because I'm new I get lost if I search for "diode" in an electronics store! I don't want to buy the components for the board itself, but components to do first projects!

Thanks for your help.

I suggest you buy components for a specific project and always get more than you need. I would never buy fewer than 10 of most components. If you do that you will build up a collection and you will know that everything you have you needed at least once.

You can get kits for resistors and capacitors, but I think you just end up with every value you will never need.

I am not sure what you call expensive but I bought a Mega board for about $15AU and a starter kit full of sensors, switches and a display for about $35AU. It also had a small bread board and a heap of wires.

Check out Ebay.

The starter kit is approximately 90€ on amazon, so it's not cheap, right? And yes, I will always buy more components than I need, but currently I just don't have anything beside some LEDs and resistors.

It's tough to make suggestions without knowing what you want to do. I'm sure the "starter kits" come with stuff I'd never use. "Everybody" uses 10K resistors and 0.1uF capacitors!

And, everybody needs a breadboard. And, you'll probably want a multimeter. When something doesn't work as expected you'll need to check voltage or resistance. (and "continuity"). If cost is an issue a cheap meter is better than no meter. And, eventually you'll probably want to (or need to) solder, so a soldering iron, solder, flux, etc.

It's always a good idea to buy extra components. Most parts are cheap and you can end-up spending more on shipping than the actual parts. Then depending on what your plans are you want to by a resistor assortment and a capacitor assortment.

And buy from reliable suppliers. Don't buy from ebay or 3rd-party Amazon suppliers, etc. Try to avoid any sellers that don't give you the manufacturer's part number and a link to the manufacturer's datasheet. If you're here in the U.S., some "good suppliers" are Mouser & Digikey (industry distributers that also sell to hobbyists) or Jameco, SparkFun, Adafruit (who mostly sell to hobbyists).

I have an agilent multimeter for $200, a DC power supply (0-30V, 0-10A), soldering iron etc. I just don't have used any micro controller before and some components which you often use at the same time. I'm not in the US, but I will buy from conrad.de. I just thought I could find a bill of material instead of investing hours to find out which diode is suitable for use with arduino etc. But ok, if that does not exist, I'll buy the starter kit anyway!

Amazon always seems to be twice the price of anywhere else.

Most of the kits from Sparkfun and Adafruit and I think here also have a list of parts that come in their kits - go take a look at the parts -I have gotten a couple of kits with the parts because I didn't want to spend a lot of time looking for a parts - shipping on a few items will sometimes kill you as opposed to a kit that is only shipped in one box

One observation on processors - some Sparkfun processors require the programming software to be modified from say the plain UNO - I found that to be a pain and threw the processor in my "junk parts I will never use box" and got a plain UNO to replace it

The kit here comes with a thick PRINTED manual - that I like as opposed to the online stuff

good luck

I usually buy the cheapest component that seems to fulfill my requirements. This is the easiest way. When I find it is not the right for the task at hand you usually also know what to look for.

Note that cheapest means widely used = there is a good chance it is the item you are looking for.

PerryBebbington:
I suggest you buy components for a specific project and always get more than you need. I would never buy fewer than 10 of most components. If you do that you will build up a collection and you will know that everything you have you needed at least once.

Not necessarily ten, but get three or four microprocessor modules just to start with.

I recommend you do not get a UNO or Mega 2560. Their form factor is extremely inconvenient unless you propose to use them with "shields" and the "barrel jack" is not a useful way of powering them so is quite superfluous. Nanos generally come with header pins; if not fitted you can solder connections directly for more permanent use.

With the header pins soldered, they fit in "solderless breadboards" which are the most practical way of simple experimentation so you should get a few of those as well. You can also mount the Nano to "stripboard" or protoboard or as a daughterboard to a custom PCB for a completed application. And you can get "terminal adapter" boards to connect to plain wires. The Nano is clearly the most versatile.

Other than that, look at a number of projects you might want to work on and just get the parts needed for these - in multiples. Starter kits provide only one of the major modules including the microcontroller itself, so that is very limiting as it implies you make one project, do the "exercise" with it and then break it down for the next. Very few of us would work like that! :astonished:

For quick prototyping I prefer Uno. It does not consume breadboard space and uses the mini-USB instead of micro-USB of most other boards. I need one additional cable but it is much more reliable from my experience.

For "final" device I usually use a bare processor because most of the other features is not needed and only consume current.

Odd. A genuine UNO uses a full size USB “B” connector while the Nano uses a “mini-USB”. Some clones use the Micro-USB.

The problem is that it has only header sockets, you can prototype with jumper wires but that does not suit any more permanent and reliable assembly unless you have or construct a “shield”.

For “final” devices, a Pro Mini (clone) is the most practical as it is cheap, compact, well built and well tested and contains all the necessary parts including bypasses and crystal (or resonator). It just isn’t worth assembling the same and you can generally ignore (or remove if necessary to conserve battery power) any superfluous parts including the regulator, indicator LEDs and reset button.

You are right about the connectors. USB type B is the ugly bulky but reliable connector of UNO. My Nanos (clones) have micro-USB (the same as cell phones and nearly all gadgets) which is causing me trouble all the time.

About the Pro Mini clone it is matter of personal preferences I think. A bare ATMega chip needs only a few decoupling caps to run. Even the resonator is often redundant - I like the much faster wake up time when using internal oscillator. If doing something where precise timing is important the resonator is not good enough anyway - extarnal watch crystal for Timer2 gives better results.
And I prefer adding my own caps of known origin and a regulator of known characteristics (if needed at all) over unknown stuff from eBay. For me adding the few extra parts is similar amount of work to removing all the unwanted stuff.

No matter what we recommend, your first project will be stopped because you don’t have the one part that no one recommended. (Murphy’s Law).

There are a lot of “starter” kits for $35 or less that have an assortment of resistors, capacitors LEDs and sensors. Buy one. Experiment with all of the sensors using the example sketches in the IDE. This is how you learn the IDE and programming basics.

If you just buy just the parts you need for a given project, the shipping costs will mount very quickly. For example, I buy my resistors 100 at a time because it makes no sense to pay $7 for shipping $1 worth of resistors. But I have enough 1K resistors to last for years of projects.

My go-to board for most projects is the Wemos D1 Mini. It’s only $5 and I buy them 6 at a time.

No matter what we recommend, your first project will be stopped because you don't have the one part that no one recommended. (Murphy's Law).

Steve's law, surely?
I think Murphy's law is: 'Anything that can go wrong will go wrong', although Murphy might have had too much Guinness when he said that.

Key components include 100nF ceramic decoupling capacitors, ~220 ohm resistors for LED current limiting
and BJT base current limiting, ~10k resistors for pullups. Add a few ~100uF electrolytics for extra decoupling,
some 10k linear pots, LEDs, push buttons, and probably 0.1" pitch headers and hookup wires.

For semiconductors, 1N4148, 1N4001 diodes, 2N2222A BJTs and some logic-level MOSFETs perhaps, if
you plan to switch some DC loads. Don’t buy semiconductors from untrusted sources like eBay, you
will only get useless fakes.

PerryBebbington:
Steve's law, surely?
I think Murphy's law is: 'Anything that can go wrong will go wrong', although Murphy might have had too much Guinness when he said that.

Too much Guinness????? No such thing. Mothers milk.

MarkT:
Key components include 100nF ceramic decoupling capacitors, ~220 ohm resistors for LED current limiting
Don't buy semiconductors from untrusted sources like eBay, you
will only get useless fakes.

I buy nearly all my components fro Element14 (Newark in the US). About 80% of the time their prices are better than Ebay and if you have a business account you can get quotes from them even cheaper, especially if you want multiples. I just bought 1000 mosfets for 0.1 cents each. You may say you would never need that many (I do for my projects) but for that price who cares.

Once you buy components in quantity (unless using something exotic) its usually
the PCB / connector / enclosure costs that dominate, not the jelly-bean components.

Back to the original topic: I often use my THT "E2" resistor set: 3R3, 10R, 33R and so on up to 33M (which is not so common, most resistors end at 10M). The steps are close enough for most purposes yet the amount of different values is manageable. For digital "E1" set may be enough.
For soldered prototypes I have set of 0603 SMD resistors (they fit between two adjacent holes) and 0805 SMD resistors (soldered diagonally).