lattepanda alpha arduino led light possibility?

hey never done anything with arduino before so wondering if this is possible. i found this: https://www.amazon.ca/Traffic-Display-Module-Arduino-Mini-Traffic/dp/B07T656KCK/ref=sr_1_63?keywords=5mm+leds&qid=1588482519&sr=8-63
i have a latte panda alpha which has built in arduino stuff on it from factory. i was thinking, like i said i have no experience here, could that led be used and programmed on a hackintosh to light up based on cpu temp? like mayb 0-60 green 61-80 yellow and 81+ red.

What else would i need besides that led board?

Here is a link to my device https://www.dfrobot.com/product-1728.html
it has if this helps
Co-processor:Arduino Leonardo
GPIO & Other Features:2x 50p GPIOs including I2C, I2S, USB, RS232, UART, RTC,Power Management,Extendable power button,everything you need

I have arduino software installed i just dont know how to proceed and what all id need to do the abobve if i even can

thank you

The blurb says that the Panda has an "arduino built in" but it seems the layout and pins are not standard. As a result unless you find somebody who has used one of these you will need to have enough skill and experience to navigate yourself through all the issues.

That is way, way, way overkill for displaying CPU temperature in lights. I would start with a $3 eBay Pro Mini and learn how Arduino works first, then finish the project by adding a few LEDs and a temperature sensor to the Pro Mini.

The OP already seems to have a Panda, the price I saw for one of these was $400, maybe that includes Windows licences?

Using a Rasberry Pi and then a 'real' Arduino would be a lot cheaper but maybe the OP has other uses for the Panda and playing with the Arduino is a side line. On the one hand the fact that they are including a co-processor is good but unless there is a group of people supporting it things could be a bit tricky.

I suppose you could use the thing to mine BitCoins while displaying the temperature in lights.

The Arduino bit on the lattepanda is effectively linked to the PC part only via the UART connection, the PC part having the Arduino IDE already built in and you program it via that.
The traffic light thingy doesn’t look suitable ( it’s the wrong voltage too) but you can connect three separate resistors and LED’s to the digital outputs for indication and write a short sketch . Use a DS18b20 to measure the temperature.
The PC part may already have a processor temperature sensor built in that it can access - dunno .

Have a look in google , I have a feeling there are some “shields” or adapters for the Panda I/O pins which could be useful .

thanks, maybe ill skip it then. Then panda did come with a windows license and i do have windows installed as well but i mainly use this for MacOs. I thoought if i could do an inexpensive little thing just to try it out wouldnt be bad but seems like it might be a lot more then i expected. The problem is if its hooked to the windows side only it wont really get used.

kasek:
thanks, maybe ill skip it then. Then panda did come with a windows license and i do have windows installed as well but i mainly use this for MacOs. I thoought if i could do an inexpensive little thing just to try it out wouldnt be bad but seems like it might be a lot more then i expected. The problem is if its hooked to the windows side only it wont really get used.

Sorry if I put you off, don't give up too easy.
You are a newbie here but have not given your background if you give some details people can give feeback at the right level.
Does the Panda come with MacOs as standard?
Regardless, start with the standard Panda setup. The Arduino is an integrated co-processor so the documentation must tell how to communicate between the Panda and the Arduino and how to run a sketch - right?

Do that. You don't need LEDs or any extra hardware just get the Panda to run a sketch on the Arduino that says "hello world" every second.

Now you are winning. The next step would be to get use Mac Os to do exactly the same thing (of course if Panda supports that OS it should be easy).

After that you can add hardware and program it from the Mac Os.

Some tips just in case you are a complete newbie;

Ideally you should be earthed while touching the boards.
If not at least try to avoid touching components, handle boards by edges.
Do not put the board on conductive surfaces when running.
You will need a resistor when using LEDs to avoid damaging the Arduino - read up on it.