LM34 again. Making the sensor head water safe

What is recommended to make the metal can of the sensor water proof? I want to submerge it.

I soldered three wires onto the sensor leads and hot tube shrink'd them. Can I enclose the sensor and the tiny bit of exposed leads in a small ball of hot glue?

Any ideas appeciated. Steve.

I haven't tried this but you could probably solder long wires to the leads and put heat shrink on them so that the wires and leads can't touch anything. Put the sensor in a small length of copper tubing and fill it with epoxy. You should end up with a copper tube filled with epoxy with 3 wires hanging out. That should work pretty well. The copper and epoxy may slow down the temperature response of the sensor so be sure to test one first.

You can get something called "plasticote", it's a rubber like liquid (more or less) used to dip tool handles in to keep them from slipping out of your hands. I have seen this stuff used waterproof small microphones that was used to record underwater sounds

I have three working LM35 temp probes embedded in copper tubing in the manner suggested by jes1510 above. They work fine. That said, I like the plasticote idea better, but haven't tried it.

Thank you to all responders.

Does anyone know which plasti-kote product works best? There are many listed.

Thanks. Steve.

I've seen an instructable about that.

http://www.instructables.com/id/Water-proofed-temperature-sensor/

i hope it works for you.

I've seen an instructable about that.

http://www.instructables.com/id/Water-proofed-temperature-sensor/

i hope it works for you.

Read it. Thanks.

My sensor reads max of 300F. I don't know what temp melting plastic reaches, or what temp hot glue reaches, because I am concerned that these temps might damage the sensor... (LM34 metal can)

I think I lean toward the (thin) plasti-kote or (thin) epoxy seal instead of the plastic sleeve. I would think the plastic pen barrel would form too much of an insulator.

Have a good day. Steve.