Miniaturizing My Arduino UNO Project

i built a simple circuit w/ a vibration sensor (signal, ground, 5v) and an LED (anode, cathode)

  1. LED starts off.
  2. Trigger vibration sensor and the LED turns on.

I attached a picture for reference.

Please let me know how to make this into a small package for personal use and possibly low level production. For example, what’s the smallest Arduino board for use when only a few connections and pins like this are required?

Are there off the shelf ways of packaging this all up in a nice small container or will I need to 3d print my own container?

Any assistance is appreciated.

inventabuild: i built a simple circuit w/ a vibration sensor (signal, ground, 5v) and an LED (anode, cathode)

  1. LED starts off.
  2. Trigger vibration sensor and the LED turns on.

I attached a picture for reference.

Please let me know how to make this into a small package for personal use and possibly low level production. For example, what's the smallest Arduino board for use when only a few connections and pins like this are required?

Are there off the shelf ways of packaging this all up in a nice small container or will I need to 3d print my own container?

Any assistance is appreciated.

For something small I use a Nano and solder the wires I need directly to the board.

Please use an internet search for plastic enclosures. No one here can imagine what you are thinking for your project.

Paul

Great and thank you, the nano should work. If you're aware of any quick tutorials or YouTube videos on how to solder to the nano board please let me know.

I'm sure solder tip size, diameter of solder, size of wire, etc can make a big difference. This will be my first time soldering to a board. Thank you.

I don't know which country you are in, but lead based solder is the easiest to learn with. Best is "flux core" solder, 63/37 percent mix lead/tin. And the smallest diameter you can find, in the beginning.

Wire size is the smallest multi-strand wire that is tinned, meaning it is coated with solder or tin. That makes it easier to solder to. The wire needs to be quite flexible.

I don't know about video solder training, but they are likely available.

Paul

A Wemos D1 mini is even smaller than a Nano!

https://nl.aliexpress.com/item/32633763949.html?src=google&src=google&albch=shopping&acnt=494-037-6276&isdl=y&slnk=&plac=&mtctp=&albbt=Google_7_shopping&aff_platform=google&aff_short_key=UneMJZVf&&albagn=888888&albcp=6459980570&albag=76980386066&trgt=743612850714&crea=nl32633763949&netw=u&device=c&gclid=Cj0KCQiAxrbwBRCoARIsABEc9shg0j5obRlUymOcq-9zmKq5-3LOkMIOQpsOYUGBFGOnLcccfmtUvEQaAlEZEALw_wcB&gclsrc=aw.ds

You will probably hardly becomes tinier than that:

Here it is an Arduino ProMini and directly underneath a USB UART.

The most bulky parts in every project is usually the cables.

Here you just don't need any.

I have assumed, that your project finally needs a USB connection.
If it does not, the Pro-Mini is still the best choice, just use it without the USB UART, it will be even tinier.
And it will consume far less power, since the most power is required by the USB chip.

you can pull out the chip(atmega328pu),put it on the breadboard, and then connect two capacity and one oscillator,it can work.
you can look for some data about minimum system。