Potentiometer turning off arduino

Hi, I am trying to change the value of an integer with my 10K potentiometer... When I plug the potentiometer in, the Arduino shuts off. I have checked whether the potentiometer actually works with a multimeter and it is working fine. Also, I have tried placing a 10k resistor between the potentiometer and 5v. I have one end of the potentiometer running to 5v, the other end running to GND and the center runnning to A0.

Thanks for any help.

JaydenCLarky: Hi, I am trying to change the value of an integer with my 10K potentiometer... When I plug the potentiometer in, the Arduino shuts off. I have checked whether the potentiometer actually works with a multimeter and it is working fine. Also, I have tried placing a 10k resistor between the potentiometer and 5v. I have one end of the potentiometer running to 5v, the other end running to GND and the center runnning to A0.

Thanks for any help.

Hi, Place a 100 nF capacitor between A0 and GND. Connet the potentiometer first and then the arduino. Regards

vffgaston: Hi, Place a 100 nF capacitor between A0 and GND. Connect the potentiometer first and then the Arduino. Regards

Thanks for your fast reply, I do not have a 100nF capacitor so is there any alternatives? If not then I will go buy some tomorrow. Thanks

That might not be the caue of the problem. Can you show us your circuit?

ChrisTenone: That might not be the caue of the problem. Can you show us your circuit?

Sorry I am currently not able to show you the circuit at the moment. But I can say the circuit is: one end of the potentiometer (pot) is going to 5v, the other end of the pot is going to GND, and the centre of the pot is going to A0. Also I will have to get back to you in 12 hrs as I live in New Zealand (quite late here). Thanks for your reply

JaydenCLarky: Thanks for your fast reply, I do not have a 100nF capacitor so is there any alternatives? If not then I will go buy some tomorrow. Thanks

Hi, I am afraid there aren't. As Chris says, there may be another reasons for the problem, but the capacitor won't make any harm. (I have had many problems reading analog channels "nude": not all of them but many were solved by using the capacitor). Regards.

It sounds like you've shorted 5V to ground. Perhaps monitor the 5V rail voltage with a multimeter next time?

The capacitor is not needed unless the pot is on the end of a cable which might pick up noise.

I’d agree this sounds like a short - check the pot with a multimeter to ensure the wiper is connected to the analog pin - ie the centre pin is the wiper

Don’t suppose it happens to be a linear slide potentiometer?

Yeah, I’m off to bed too! Two hours behind NZ.

Hi, thanks for all your replies.
I have two potentiometers, I checked both and they are both causing the Arduino to turn off.
I presume this means the potentiometers are fine and there is possibly a short.
When the Arduino does turn off my computer says (from what I can remember) that there is a power surge.
I believe this means there is a short on the Arduino itself as it drawing large amounts of current. I think I will just go and get some 100nF capacitors as they sound like they will solve the problem.
This is the pot: https://www.jaycar.co.nz/10k-ohm-linear-b-single-gang-24mm-potentiometer/p/RP3510
Also, I attached a schematic for my circuit.

But I can say the circuit is: one end of the potentiometer (pot) is going to 5v, the other end of the pot is going to GND, and the centre of the pot is going to A0.

It's probably wired wrong. That is, the physical connections may not match the schematic and I'd guess you've mis-identified the wiper (center) terminal of the pot. Do you know how to check that with your ohmmeter (multimeter)?

If you have a regular-old pot like [u]this[/u] it's easy to identify the center/wiper. Other configurations can be misleading unless you carefully check the datasheet.

"Shorting" the Arduino analog input to +5V or ground (or anything in-between) won't hurt anything. But if the pot is wired wrong you can short 5V to ground (depending on how it's adjusted), killing the power supply and possibly damaging the pot.

DVDdoug:
It’s probably wired wrong. That is, the physical connections may not match the schematic and I’d guess you’ve misidentified the wiper (center) terminal of the pot. Do you know how to check that with your ohmmeter (multimeter)?

"Shorting" the Arduino analog input to +5V or ground (or anything in-between) won’t hurt anything. But if the pot is wired wrong you can short 5V to ground (depending on how it’s adjusted), killing the power supply and possibly damaging the pot.

Hi,
I have fixed the issue. I was getting normal readings from the POT directly, however, when I placed the POT on the breadboard I was getting 0 ohms. Turns out the POT pins were not touching the breadboards rails. - Dumb mistake on my behalf.
Thanks for all your help and I will be sure to check twice next time

JaydenCLarky: Turns out the POT pins were not touching the breadboards rails.

If the pins weren't touching the bread-board rails, then no problem would be expected, right?

Is it more like you plugged the pot pins into the bread-board into slots that those pins should not be plugged into?