Test equipment

@LarryD,

You ROCK !

I just got one of these...

Larry- I thought that was what it was. Just wanted to make sure. I don’t have any led segment displays laying around yet. Do you use it a lot? While I was in electronics for awhile, I was away from it for 25yrs too. I was more into analog circuits and HF transmitters. This mcu stuff is new territory for me. I understand the concepts easy enough, but have to work through the complexities.

As for the rework station, I have a Tenma hot air station that does alright. Even my Xytronic temp controlled solder station works good. Having a dro of the temp would be nice though. I recall trying to solder something and, since one hand was holding the wire and the other the iron, placed it by my lip to see if it was getting hot. Depth perception is under rated IMO. I had a burn across both upper and lower…lesson learned. That was probably 30yrs ago. Still traumatized by it…

@Raschemmel- looks expensive, and besides- if I were to get one of those, where would I put my particle accelerator and fusion reactor that runs all this stuff???
You might have a 1Ghz scope and an electron microscope, but I have more stuff on my desk. That might not be a good thing though…

Not meaning to butt in here, I have a couple of temp controlled irons but never knew what a good soldering temp is (250 C, 300?).
TIA

Rigol DP832 Bench Power Supply,
Rigol MSO2102A Scope,
Aoyue 968 Rework station,
Siglent 810 function generator,
Andostar USB microscope,
Fluke 177 DMM
Fluke 289 DMM

@outsider, never got into the metric thing, but I try to keep the heat to as little as possible to efficiently do the job. I think I'm around 575F in general.
Most of the chips out there have specs for allowable heat and times in the datasheets to prevent damage. There is also different temp solders to make things more interesting.

@raschemmel

I just got one of these...

Going to call you the "Wizard of ARD", short for Wizard of Arduino :wink:
We bow down.

@tinman13kup
They are becoming less available.
Got a large handful from Crossroads, should last me for the next 15-20 years.
Mostly use them for small package size projects.
This version is small and BTW it glows in the dark :wink:

LCD displays are more flexible but larger.

I am sure you will find this Arduino platform fun to use.

placed it by my lip to see if it was getting hot. :confused:

I have seen others do that over the years.
I just try to see if a small bit of solder melts on the tip :wink:

Sounds like you will fit in here quite nicely.
raschemmel is the oldest one here, he's really really old.
He has quite a successful bottle business.

Not meaning to butt in here, I have a couple of temp controlled irons but never knew what a good soldering temp is (250 C, 300?).
TIA

For a soldering iron, I like mine on the hot side ~410C.
Get in, get out quickly.
For the 'Hot Air Wand' between 340 to 400C, depends on the size of the nozzle and on the air pressure.

Liquid flux should be on hand.

LarryD:
raschemmel is the oldest one here, he's really really old.

Are you saying Raschannel designed the first TTL computer?

I will say he does have some nice toys at his disposal.

I've been gathering some items to make the vaccum tool you posted earlier. I found an old air pump that I could reverse the input on and found the syringe. A quick mockup and trial has it working just fine. Now I have to locate some softer air line and modify the needle a bit. I'm thinking about trying a soft coupling at the end to help with a seal. Perhaps the insulation off some Cat5 wire.

As for the development board, I've been pondering what I might find useful. You have a buck converter on yours and power it with 12V? I have a little buck PWM controller and many of the passives I pulled from an old laptop board and was thinking on doing similar to what you have, so I have 12V available for circuits as well as 5V for the MCU and other circuits as needed and only require a single supply. I also want to drop in a straight 5V input and bypass the buck for when I don't need 12V. It should be simple enough and since it's a tiny TDFN package I get to try out the vacuum tool too. It also means I need to immerse myself in the datasheets so I can get the passives figured out. It's a one shot deal, as I only have 1 chip and no way to breadboard it.

"Are you saying Raschannel designed the first TTL computer?"
I think he heats his house with old vacuum tubes. :wink:

Buck converter.
I have used this version a lot.

I power it with a 9V 1amp wallwart.

Clear line that is use with aquariums works well.

I'm sure I have some air tube here, just need to go out in the garage and look.

Those buck converters are nice to have around but I also like the challenge of building the circuit myself. It allows a little more flexibility and makes me use my noggin more. I also find it helps to understand the circuits better. It's not that I'm out to reinvent the wheel, but I like to play with the spokes from time to time. I see that converter and see it as a chip, 3 caps, a diode, an inductor and a pot.

Switching converters are difficult to design.
This version has regulation and shut down circuitry built in.

For $2 :slight_smile: I use these as a daughter card and put my efforts into other endeavours such as the application design, software and final construction.

This is my version of the pickup tool in the YouTube video.

The yellow stuff in the syringe is 5 minute epoxy.
The suction cups are only needed for larger, heavier chips.

I cut the holes in the piston and syringe side with a hot 3/16" brass pipe.

$10 on Amazon.com
https://www.amazon.com/Tetra-77853-Whisper-Pump-40-Gallon/dp/B0009YF4FI/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1477167512&sr=8-1&keywords=Tetra+77853+Whisper+Air+Pump%2C+40-Gallon

I might have to go grab one of those pumps. Mine is working for now, but it's old and the rubber cups are showing it. One has a hole in it. I had to run up to the local mom-n-pop store up the road (I'm in the country) and they have some surplus/return tools they get at auction and resell. One of the items they had happened to be a vacuum pump for $50. Of course it moved 2.5cfm which could be problematic, but I could use it to clean off my desk too.
Nahh. I guess I'm going to town tomorrow.

Yes, I can understand what you are saying about designing switch mode converters. I have quite a few different chips, and some of the datasheets seem to leave you hanging in the breeze for utilizing it. The one I'm using is an intersil ISL6341, which seems to have a detailed datasheet with all the equations needed. The pin descriptions seem to be pretty easy to follow as well. I'm not saying it's a 5min job, but it's doable.

I think he heats his house with old vacuum tubes.

Actually, when I lived in Southern California, I did have an old Tektronix tube scope that I used to heat my room. I sold it for $100 to another DeVry Student in 1995. I bought a Leader 20 Mhz for $95 at Halted Specialties in Sunnyvale, CA.
_10 percent duty cycle.jpg

Are you saying Raschannel designed the first TTL computer?"

Yes. Here it is…

TRIBUTE 82 Lighitng Controller (3).jpg

In this case, I guess TTL stands for Twisted Tangled Leads :slight_smile:

Ahhh, that's why the electron microscope....To see the bottom of that :o

DON'T TOUCH IT!!!! I know where each wire is!

DON'T TOUCH IT!!!! I know where each wire is!

Actually , if you look closely, each wire is labeled. The circuit worked flawlessly on the first test.

(it was really a CMOS circuit)

raschemmel:
Actually , if you look closely, each wire is labeled. The circuit worked flawlessly on the first test.

(it was really a CMOS circuit)

Don't for one second believe that I don't think you know what you are doing.

It did remind me on some of the wire bundles in the racks in the Navy. A million white wires running everywhere (neatly bundled) with a little tag on both ends.

A million white wires running everywhere

Navy whites.

.

It did remind me on some of the wire bundles in the racks in the Navy. A million white wires running everywhere (neatly bundled) with a little tag on both ends.

It looks scarier than it really is. It's mostly just tedious. That circuit was built in 1982, the year IBM released the IBM PC. and only a few years after Intel released the first microprocessor chips. Obviously it would be done differently today. It was a complex timing controller requiring many different monostable and astable vibrators, (one shots and oscillators) The pots were for setting the time delay of the one shots or the frequency of the oscillators. All of that was done with LM555 chips (a whole BUNCH of them. Don't recall exactly how many but it was too many any way you look at it) The main concern with that particular controller is that it HAD to work PERFECTLY the first time because it was for special event contracted by the Los Angeles Museum of Fine Arts in Paramount Studio's Sound Stage 13 (where the first Star Trek movie was filmed). Leanard Nemoy and William Shatner were guest speakers for the event and the controller had to work. There would be no time to troubleshoot it if it didn't and the Hollywood city regulations required that the equipment pass a functional test for the Fire Marshall at noon on the day of the party (which was in the evening) Failure to pass the test means the owner of all the equipment is immediately evicted from the premises with all their equipment. Thay are given several hours to vacate the premises and then the police are called to drag them out kicking and screaming. So , yeah, no pressure.

Oh, and please don't ask for the Fritzing for that circuit like Larry did.... ;D

Navy whites.

No . Air Force Hospital Whites. (I was an Air Force Hospital corpsman- ICU, Tachikawa, Japan, 1969 -1971)

raschemmel:
@LarryD,

You ROCK !

I just got one of these...

Your's is much bigger than mine.

I don't trust anyone with a clean desk...