Trick for multiplying or splitting the ground and 5V wires when you need many

I am building an interface with about 14 potmeters - so each needs a ground and 5V wire. But the Arduino only has 2 ground and 1 5V. Now I did not want to daisy chain because I am still prototyping. And I didn’t want to cut my jumper wires.

I just did another trick for multiplying/splitting the ground and 5V wires. Instead of daisy chaining them from one potmeter to the next, I decided to use the female connector of a ribbon cable crimp-on piece. I have one with 16 pins. But if you need less just get a crimp-on piece for a 6 core ribbon, for example.

The back of a crimp on connector has many small teeth that normally bite into the ribbon when you crimp it on. You can solder all these together. I just placed a bare wire in between them and solder it up.

Then you get a neat small block that takes you from one ground wire to 15. When you are done you can put some tape over the back to prevent accidental short circuit. See attached pictures.

Maybe think about multiplexing the potentiometers and use a button and led to keep track of the function. You'll save yourself alot of wiring.

You can also snake a wire back and forth from one IDC pin to its brother.
Crimp all at once, no soldering.

1.jpg

DIY busbar ?

larryd:
You can also snake a wire back and forth from one IDC pin to its brother.
Crimp all at once, no soldering.

Very nice and clean that one!

@larryd you should perhaps even consider posting in some of the other places where people are desperate for those tricks. I have seen several threads where the weirdest and ugliest (solder heavy) solutions are offered. There is even one thread where someone offers to do a kickstarter for a component/shield that splits the ground header.

marnixdekker:
Very nice and clean that one!

@larryd you should perhaps even consider posting in some of the other places where people are desperate for those tricks. I have seen several threads where the weirdest and ugliest (solder heavy) solutions are offered. There is even one thread where someone offers to do a kickstarter for a component/shield that splits the ground header.

Done.

See this thread, 600+ posts discussing hints.

marnixdekker:
I am building an interface with about 14 potmeters - so each needs a ground and 5V wire.

Now here’s the real question - why would you do that? Decoration?

Ear rings ?

+1 :grinning:

You could just as easily buy a couple of feet of electrical wire from the hardware store and strip the insulation off to make GND and +5V
busbars. It would work as well as anything you mentioned and has the advantage of being formable to any shape you want. It's not daisy chaining because the busbar is several times the diameter of any other wire in your circuit. You bend it in half and run it down both sides of a box and use plastic cable clips to attach it. It costs almost nothing and is longer and cheaper and anything you mentioned. Standard solid copper house electrical wire exceeds any current requirements you would have. If you want , you can leave the insulation on mist of it and cut it off whereever you want to tap into it.
I still think the greatest appeal if this thead is wondering what the hell you need 14 potentiometers for and if they really are 5V why you're not using Digital Pots.

raschemmel:
I still think the greatest appeal if this thead is wondering what the hell you need 14 potentiometers for and if they really are 5V why you're not using Digital Pots.

My point entirely.

I suspect it's another "installation" - something with which you are particularly familiar - and the pots are there with big knobs to twiddle! :grinning:

If you need to control parameters, a rotary encoder is the way to go - as used on most advanced medical equipment nowadays - though it needs to be in association with a display.

It is unusual for an OP to repeatedly omit the reason or motive for a project. They don't always explain it in the OP but at some poibt they give a reason. In this case , "I am doing 'sonething' that uses 14 pots...". So WHY is the nature of the "device" specifically withheld ?

Well, there is generally an element of ego involved - "it's my project", "I know what I'm doing, just give me what I asked for". This is of course, the basis for the "XY Problem".

However in this case, "I'm not asking for help, I don't need help, I am just offering a clever idea!" which is clearly true. Whether he chooses to answer my impertinent question is neither here nor there. :grinning:

raschemmel:
It is unusual for an OP to repeatedly omit the reason or motive for a project.

Really? Are we on the same forum?

Unfortunate, yes. Annoying, certainly. But it sure isnt unusual.

That should be a red flag.
Maybe their project is questionable.

marnixdekker:
I am building an interface with about 14 potmeters - so each needs a ground and 5V wire. But the Arduino only has 2 ground and 1 5V. Now I did not want to daisy chain because I am still prototyping. And I didn't want to cut my jumper wires.

I just did another trick for multiplying/splitting the ground and 5V wires. Instead of daisy chaining them from one potmeter to the next, I decided to use the female connector of a ribbon cable crimp-on piece. I have one with 16 pins. But if you need less just get a crimp-on piece for a 6 core ribbon, for example.

The back of a crimp on connector has many small teeth that normally bite into the ribbon when you crimp it on. You can solder all these together. I just placed a bare wire in between them and solder it up.

Then you get a neat small block that takes you from one ground wire to 15. When you are done you can put some tape over the back to prevent accidental short circuit. See attached pictures.

Hi marnixdekker,

I see from your blurb that you are a physics academic. Me too. I used to be a chemist, but then I got (pro/de)-moted.

Your device is cool and useful. For general use they have solderless breadboards that perform that function on a temporary basis.

Academic knowledge of C++ may be a hindrance. Arduino, "the language", is actually a paradigm imposed on C++. The cool thing is that all of "real" C++ works, and makes sense if you keep the Arduino model in mind. It's best to learn it from scratch. If you can program, it takes an afternoon to learn.