What kind of transceiver could I use for “transceiving” to 200km minimum

Hi, i’m a bit new to arduino and am looking for a good transceiver that can go to at least 200km. For details, it should be able to go from land to space as I am trying to build a satellite using arduino, kind of like the 50 Dollar Satellite by Srnet. I live in Australia and found this (https://www.jaycar.com.au/arduino-compatible-rf-transceiver-module/p/XC4522) on Jaycar, would it work?

Thanks.

433Mhz @ 20mw signal is not going to make it to space. In a urban area, they have trouble going a block.

In the US you would get a ham license and get shortwave radio in the amateur bands. You would need some power to reach up that high but amateur radio operators frequently talk with the space station when conditions are right.

Hi,
Welcome to the forum.

Please read the first post in any forum entitled how to use this forum.
http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php/topic,148850.0.html .

If you are going to build a satellite for space, you would be best to start with the satellite transport company to see what you are allowed.
Have you got a company lined up to do this?
Do you know the frequencies you are allowed to use for space communication?

Can you tell us your electronics, programming, arduino, radio and hardware experience?

Thanks.. Tom.. :slight_smile:

We must presume you have an Amateur Radio licence,

If not, the project is on hold until you obtain it.

Then you need to find a proper transceiver, possibly something like a BF-888S which is dirt cheap.

search term: link budget

Bidirectional communications are possible, legally, anywhere in the world using the Arduino compatible Rockblock satellite modem.

For sending signals to space, you can use 10 mW LoRa transceivers. People have already achieved > 700 km line of sight communications using balloons.

Both are very slow.

Sebba8:
Hi, i'm a bit new to arduino and am looking for a good transceiver that can go to at least 200km.

I live in Australia and found this (https://www.jaycar.com.au/arduino-compatible-rf-transceiver-module/p/XC4522) on Jaycar, would it work?

As the tranceiver in a small satellite, then yes it would probably work. But for the ground station end you would need to use a low noise amplifier on the receiver side and a power amplifier on the transmit side.

However these days LoRa would be the obvious choice as you would only need the modules and antennas, no amplifiers required.

Assuming you had an Amateur radio licence you could use a modern LoRa device at 22dBm, 160mW.

At an estimate you would likely be able to use a data rate of circa 20kpbs with such a 200km link, more than enough for the application.

The frequencies and modulation methods you can legally use are restricted.
See:- Radio Frequencies for Space Communication

Eyes glazed over...!

Sebba8:
Hi, i’m a bit new to arduino and am looking for a good transceiver that can go to at least 200km. For details, it should be able to go from land to space as I am trying to build a satellite using arduino, kind of like the 50 Dollar Satellite by Srnet. I live in Australia and found this (https://www.jaycar.com.au/arduino-compatible-rf-transceiver-module/p/XC4522) on Jaycar, would it work?

Thanks.

Even in Australia, the GSM band is not available for satellite communications. So research the actual frequencies that are allowed for earth to satellite communications. After that, contact the group coordinating the use of those frequencies so you don't interfere with other devices.

Paul