What kind of values should I check in a darlington datasheet?

Hi, I would like to know what kind of values or things should I check in a darlinton datasheet for an arduino / 5V / 3V project?. I don't have any project in mind but I would like to use those with arduino and others 3.3/5V ICs. PNP and NPN. I'm buying some things and I wouldn't like spend money in something which is not going to work.

Thanks!

The data sheets are there to help you pick parts appropriate for the project. It doesn't make much sense to buy a part, then have to pick the project to match.

Why do you think you will need Darlingtons? General purpose BJT's like 2N3904 and 2N2222A are far more common in projects, and you can make a custom Darlington with two of them, if you are stuck for one.

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Because I'm learning electronics and I would like to have a "real" darlington on my hands to compare with. I mean, I could build a darlinton with two BJTs but I would like to have a "good reference" when something goes wrong.

A "real" (read: commercially available) Darlington transistor consists of two ordinary BJTs in one package. Sometimes a couple of resistors are thrown in.

You will learn more if you make your own, and you can re-use the parts for another project.

Darlington Transistors are not meant for switching (i.e. on/off) They have very poor switching characteristics.

If you purchase anything I would suggest an "N-Channel Logic Level MosFet"

OK then,

Do not buy any obsolete Darlington transistors.

They are simply not useful.

That is about the size of it. Take two transistors, connect them as a Darlington, play with it, see how it works, then disassemble it and move on to serious electronics.

May be useful for this:

Max voltage, max current and dissipation - otherwise there's nothing interesting really, they are all similar in performance and behaviour. They all have a gain around 1000, and drop 1V or more for Vsat and are all slow (this can preclude PWM)

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