Joystick that sticks on the y axis?

I've scoured the internet and I can find nothing pertaining to the joysticks used in drone and airplane controllers that stick on the y axis (so you don't have to hold the throttle down the whole time). What are these called? Where can I find them?

Do you mean they physically stick? I can't help on that, but you can get the same (or similar) effect in software, even though the spring returns the stick to the centre.

In that case, forward of zero means increase speed, back from zero means decrease. So if you hold it forward the speed increases, and if you let it spring back to zero, the speed stays the same.

Have a look at Delta_G's reply # 12 here.

Hi,
RC joysticks are available with that facility, or you can buy a standard sprung one and remove the return springs.

Tom… :slight_smile:

This link has code to do what you want (if I understand your requirement)

...R

pirkk:
I've scoured the internet and I can find nothing pertaining to the joysticks used in drone and airplane controllers that stick on the y axis (so you don't have to hold the throttle down the whole time). What are these called? Where can I find them?

I would think that you could buy a used RC hobby transmitter.
They already have 2 joysticks, ergonomically placed for decent flying control.
And the throttle stick does not return to center on the Y axis.

It is fairly straight forward to remove the existing electronics and put in your own.

Okay, it looks like my best bet is going to be building a throttle that springs back but holds the same value at 0 as suggested. Although I do have a controller that does physically retain its position on the y axis, and snaps back on the x axis. I would still like to know how this works, as it would be ideal to have one of these.

pirkk:
Okay, it looks like my best bet is going to be building a throttle that springs back but holds the same value at 0 as suggested. Although I do have a controller that does physically retain its position on the y axis, and snaps back on the x axis. I would still like to know how this works, as it would be ideal to have one of these.

From what I recall from some years ago it is a fairly simple matter to remove the self-centering spring. I suspect Google could help.

...R

pirkk:
I've scoured the internet and I can find nothing pertaining to the joysticks used in drone and airplane controllers that stick on the y axis (so you don't have to hold the throttle down the whole time). What are these called? Where can I find them?

I believe this might have been of use to you!