power arduino with trafo?

hey everyone,

im sure this is pretty basic but im very new to this...

till now all my little projects were made on a breadboard while powering my arduino with a usb cable.
now for my new project i need this to run standalone without a PC/laptop.

Long story short: i want to power my arduino from the main power in our house.
Here in austria we have 230V AC and of course i cant connect that directly to my arduino... well i can but wouldnt be i good idea i guess hehe

the problem is: there is no power socket where i can plug in something like a iphone charge to run the arduino with an usb cable.

so how can i power my arduino?
can i use a LED Trafo (230V AC in / 12V DC out) to run my arduino?

Use a 5volt cellphone charger with USB socket, and plug the USB lead of the Arduino in there.
Leo..

RayGenWurm:
the problem is: there is no power socket where i can plug in something like a iphone charge to run the arduino with an usb cable.

no power socket = no phone charger...

Then where is the 230V AC for your "trafo" going to come from? And what exactly is a "trafo"?

Steve

trafo = common abbreviation of “transformer”. And indeed if you have a way to connect that 12V power supply, you have a way to connect a 5V power supply, such as an old mobile phone charger. If not, get an extension cord. It shouldn’t be hard to find one offering 10-12 or even more outlets, and some USB sockets to boot (so you don’t even need that mobile phone charger any more).

LED power supplies may be constant voltage or constant current. If constant voltage you’re getting close. Get a 5V one, then you’re talking, as that you can use to power your Arduino and all other 5V peripherals without overheating the on board linear regulator.

3xAA battery pack to the USB port will work. (Or C cells, or D cells)
Or to 5V on the power header.
Or 5xAA, 6xAA to the barrel jack so you have >7V coming in, with some drop across the reverse polarity protection diode and the 5V regulator.

trafo = common abbreviation of "transformer".

Not in the USA. I've never heard that in 40 years. I've seen XRMR (same number of letters) but never
"trafo" . Must be a European thing.

raschemmel:
Not in the USA. I've never heard that in 40 years. I've seen XRMR (same number of letters) but never
"trafo" . Must be a European thing.

XFMR

raschemmel:
Not in the USA. I've never heard that in 40 years. I've seen XRMR (same number of letters) but never
"trafo" . Must be a European thing.

Not in the UK either. Which does leave a few other English-speaking bits of the world.

Is it also commonly misused to mean a power supply? Where I come from a transformer is an AC-AC device.

Steve

raschemmel:
Not in the USA. I’ve never heard that in 40 years. I’ve seen XRMR (same number of letters) but never
“trafo” . Must be a European thing.

Seen all the time at diyaudio forums. Hate it, Xfmr is standard abbreviation for my generation, X stands for trans in transformer, transceiver, transmit, (but not transconductance or transistor). Never ever heard “trafo” spoken BTW.

Not sure how Xmitter for transmitter reconciles with RX/TX as an abbreviations for receive and
transmit for serial connections though.

I suspect the original usage came from the fact trans- as a prefix means “across”. X is a cross.

In more normal English jargon “Xfer” is used for “transfer” I think.

It may be telegrapher’s code originally, on reflection, as that is the origin of much signalling technology.

The use of "trafo" is common in the Dutch language for "transformator" (transformer).
Leo..