Reading/writing to EEPROMs (aka toner chips)

I recently ordered my first Arduino and I'm excited about the possibilities. One thing in particular I have been wondering about is if the Arduino would be suitable to use as a reader/writer for toner chips. You probably know what I mean by "toner chip" and why I'd want to do it, but if not, let me know and I'll elaborate.

I have not done a lot of research yet but I do know that there are many different EEPROMs that are used and I'm assuming that different ones may have their own unique requirements when it comes to communicating. From what I gather, they all use serial communications, but some are "two-wire" while others are "single-wire".

What do you think? Possible/Impossible? Easy/Hard/Extreme?

Thanks in advance. GB

The information may be Out There in the ether.. Some was for the earliest ones, years ago.

Or you might have to reverse engineer those little hand-held 'resetters' you can buy.

I just put 2 new ink cartridges in a $4000 HP printer that uses 12 colors of ink.. It had 4 small gold terminals.. (Fortunately Not My Nickle)...

Let us know what you learn...

I know people have read/written SIM cards.

inkt cartridges - the new gold .... inkt costs more than the best cognac I ever had

color laserjet is the way to go - no more cartridges drying up, fast printing.
Watch officemax or HP for $150 sale of CP1215, offered pretty regularly.
I just got a wireless print server for mine, no more dragging the laptop over to the printer (in the next room).

inkt costs more than the best cognac I ever had

But then of course, it can be hard to tell the difference between cognac and printer ink. On the other hand, the far superior Armagnac...

CrossRoads: ... color laserjet is the way to go

Totally agree except for the most critical fine art / photography stuff. Then why own it??

Just ordered a nice HP A3 size printer for our Photography group here for about $1500 .. Once calibrated and a custom profile made it should be quite close..

And HP and other aftermarket does make some nice papers.

I haven't tried printing to photo paper. Will give it a try sometime.

Needs to be Laser-specific photo paper. Some coated-for-inkjet papers will do Real Bad Stuff to laser printers..

Thanks, will be sure to get the right stuff.

Thank you. I will do some more investigating and report my findings...

[quote author=Terry King link=topic=59195.msg426076#msg426076 date=1303478124] The information may be Out There in the ether.. Some was for the earliest ones, years ago.

Or you might have to reverse engineer those little hand-held 'resetters' you can buy.

I just put 2 new ink cartridges in a $4000 HP printer that uses 12 colors of ink.. It had 4 small gold terminals.. (Fortunately Not My Nickle)...

Let us know what you learn...

I know people have read/written SIM cards. [/quote]

Hi,
There is a real issue with getting as many possible viewable-by-humans colors on a page viewed by reflected light.

Typically there are light and dark versions of magenta, cyan, and black (AKA Grays)… There is even “Clear Overpaint” used on some papers.

A friend of mine here in Vermont USA sells a system with 6+ colors of Black for museum quality black&white photographs.

Unless you are a serious photographer or graphic artist, the good old CMYK 4-ink printers are probably fine…

And even high-end color lasers are amazingly good now.

Regards, Terry King
terry@yourduino.com