Soldering on a lithium coin battery (button cell)?

Recently I bought a few small Real Time Clock DS3231 modules without battery.
https://www.ebay.com/itm/3-3V-5V-RTC-I2C-DS3231-DS3231SN-Real-Time-Clock-Module-for-Arduino-Raspberry-Pi/172658171102

I thought they would include a battery holder but they don’t.
To make them work I bought some small coin batteries and soldered them to wires to connect them.
But obviously the batteries get hot with the soldering and one or three batteries died right away.
Two batteries work so far but I am concerned that maybe I destroyed them (at least for long time usage) with the heat.

It is possible to solder wires to such batteries and can the batteries handle the heat for a few seconds?

If not, is there something like DIY spot welding? Or what are my options?

No.

Spot welding using capacitor discharge. Plenty of that on the Web. :astonished:

Get a battery holder and solder your wires to it.

You can get those cells with solder tags already welded on to permit direct mounting onto circuit boards
See here for examples https://cellpacksolutions.co.uk/products/product-category/batteries/tagged/

You are one very lucky person, you appear to have all of your body parts. These things have brought down airplanes, houses, etc. They contain the element lithium as the name indicates which is a very active element which when it gets hot enough it burns with a brilliant flame which is extremely hot. Keep your parts and buy a battery holder!
Good Luck, Have Fun! Gil

Oh, come on. A little bench top fire won't kill.
Just this morning I had a fuse explode on me, long time ago an electrolytic capacitor explosion, more recent a tantalum capacitor burst into flames... and I'm also still intact.

wvmarle:
Oh, come on. A little bench top fire won't kill.
Just this morning I had a fuse explode on me, long time ago an electrolytic capacitor explosion, more recent a tantalum capacitor burst into flames... and I'm also still intact.

I love the smell of tantalum in the morning. At someone else's lab.

But seriously, I doubt that you could start a fire with a CR1220 even if you short it. There's just not much lithium in it.

I'd be more thinking of the heat of the soldering iron - that may indeed be an issue, but indeed not too serious an issue. Maybe a little fire. If you've never had anything on fire on your electronics bench you're not trying much :slight_smile:

I’ve used these modules on a prototype board. I removed the plastic housing of the 5 way socket and cut each of the exposed double pronged connectors to remove their second prong. I then soldered a wire from the positive battery terminal to the pin marked NC and mounted the assembly on the board. I then used a button cell holder mounted elsewhere on the board to power it.

gilshultz:
You are one very lucky person, you appear to have all of your body parts. These things have brought down airplanes, houses, etc. They contain the element lithium as the name indicates which is a very active element which when it gets hot enough it burns with a brilliant flame which is extremely hot. Keep your parts and buy a battery holder!
Good Luck, Have Fun! Gil

I doubt a coin cell is going to be that exciting... They kill you if you swallow them, not by exploding.
Still soldering a lithium battery is Darwin-award territory I'm afraid.

SteveMann:
But seriously, I doubt that you could start a fire with a CR1220 even if you short it. There's just not much lithium in it.

AFAIK short circuit does little harm to primary lithium coin cells. But they HATE recharging. It is said they may explode when recharged too much (IIRC more than like 1% of capacity during lifetime). I think soldering may trigger similar runaway as recharging. Anyway the soldering may increase self-discharge rate to unacceptable values.

You cant solder to batteries unless they have pins meant to solder to spot welded on.

Go order some battery holders with solderable pins - you need some new batteries anyway now.

DrAzzy:
You cant solder to batteries unless they have pins meant to solder to spot welded on.

News to all of us who've done it already. You can usually solder to battery endcaps, because they aren't
aluminium (which genuinely won't solder). Its not necessarily easy, or advisable, you need a big enough iron, you need to clean and tin the wire and endcap and work quickly.

Note the title: "button cell". :roll_eyes: