What are these called, and where can I get them?

Hey guys,
Really new here, just ordered my first Arduino but I can’t seem to find certain parts that I want, mainly because I don’t really know what they are called.

So maybe you could point me in the right direction for finding these items.

  1. Controller Trigger, like an xbox controller. Someone said I could make one using a potentiometer, but I think I would have a hard time with that.

  2. Slider for a DJ mixer. Non-Motorized or motorized.

  3. Big rubber buttons as seen on the Novation Dicer, or really any drum pad.

Thanks guys!

1) like part of a games controller? They come as part of the controller only I think. Its possible to interface to various such controllers.

2) "10k linear slide potentiometer" for Arduino use. "10k log slide potentiometer" for direct audio. Come in various sizes and range of slider buttons is generally available.

3) That's a custom rubber button or pad - designed for use on a PCB with appropriate traces to match the conductive carbon part on the underside of the pad. Not a standard item I'm afraid - spares for some existing device might be a possible avenue.

You might like to see if these silicon buttons are what you are after https://www.adafruit.com/product/1611

  1. Slider for a DJ mixer. Non-Motorized or motorized.

That would be a [u]linear potentiometer or a slide pot[/u]. Motorized pots are expensive and relatively rare.

  1. Big rubber buttons as seen on the Novation Dicer, or really any drum pad.

You can probably find a drum pad. Otherwise I googled 'Large Pushbutton Switch' and I found [u]this[/u]. Or, you could make one with a regular momentary switch and some kind of a big button and a spring, etc.

  1. Controller Trigger, like an xbox controller. Someone said I could make one using a potentiometer, but I think I would have a hard time with that.

Maybe someone else can help with that one. I don't have an X-Box.

Here you are.

They don't seem to be selling the Xbox trigger assembly any more. It's probably still available on eBay. Or buy an old controller and dismember it. Ben Heck has some great videos on YouTube on exactly this.

Many drum pads are in fact rubber covers over a piezo sensor, not a simple switch...

Thanks to everyone who replied, it was a big help!

Thanks Mark, that's perfect, they don't seem too expensive either.

Grumpy that is a bit too small for what I was thinking, but I they would definitely work for something else I wanted to do.

The link Doug left was spot on. And yes Doug they are pretty expensive, seems like there is alot of them on ebay though, anywhere from $25 to $100.

Thanks Morgan they have a bunch of cool stuff.

And I will look into that DrAzzy thanks for the info. Edit: Is this what you mean?

Think I could make the rubber covers with a 3d printer?

Grumpy that is a bit too small for what I was thinking,

Too small buttons or not enough? Did you see the links on that page to devices with many more buttons.

Think I could make the rubber covers with a 3d printer?

No the filaments used are not flexible plastics. You might be able to mold them with brushable latex.

They are much too small. No I didn't see that, I looked again and still can't find it.

Ahh that's too bad,I just found this, it looks promosing.

I just ordered a 3d printer, and was hoping I could print rubber like stuff, I watched this video which is different style of printer and he leaves out certain materials in the resin which left it rubbery.

LittleRain: I just ordered a 3d printer

Chill out, you've got a good 3-6 months of learning before you're able to print anything worth printing (by which time the printer will have stopped working), so this is a long-term matter anyway. None of my friends with 3d printers (I have at least 3) have ever gotten past printing a few test objects. I do not belive any of their 3d printers still work.

My printer works just fine. It hasn't printed anything in months but I could switch it on right now and get a print out of it as soon as it's warmed up its extruder. I'e got the flexystruder installed on it now; I could print a flexible print in Ninjaflex.

DrAzzy, I already know how to code and 3d model, so I'm hoping my learning curve wont be too bad. I'm assuming there is more to making models with 3d printers though?

One question though Azzy, were you talking about the finger drum pads, or like one you hit with sticks?

Sorry for the pessimism.

I believe iv e seen that in both types of drum pad, but tbh I'm not sure. Sticks if any are always lost before I get my paws on them to scrap.

No I didn't see that, I looked again and still can't find it.

Well their is a picture and link off that page I posted to this:- https://learn.adafruit.com/untztrument-trellis-midi-instrument

And off that page their is a link to an even bigger one:- https://www.adafruit.com/product/1999

And what part of this advice did you not understand?

"Think I could make the rubber covers with a 3d printer?"

No the filaments used are not flexible plastics.

Ahh that's too bad,I just found this, it looks promosing.

No it sets too ridged for a button cover.

Grumpy, I'm afraid you're not up to speed on the latest 3D printed stuff. Flexible prints are available in a range of durometers (stiffness.) Home machines can do this easily now. You don't need big commercial printers. You can even use both flexible and rigid in the same print. I have the equipment to do this myself.

Ninjaflex is the brand name I'm most familiar with. The prints it makes are much more durable than the rigid PLA or ABS you might have seen before. I can print toys that a 2-year-old or a dog cannot destroy.

While I have seen flexible printing I have not seen things that are as flexible as the OP will need for his stated aim.

Ohh cool Grumpy, ya I was having trouble finding those. They are a bit too small for a drum pad, but still pretty cool and can already think of using for an addition to the drum pad.

Awesome Morgan, I can't wait to try. So do I need a different nozzle to go with that filament?

The flexible filament prints through the same nozzle, although you would probably choose a larger nozzle than regular ABS. However the feed mechanism must be different. Regular extruders will allow the filament to bend between the drive gear (hobbed bolt) and the hot end. The Ninjaflex needs a Flexystruder that doesn't have any gap there.

Lulzbot printers have this option available since the TAZ4. I don't know about other brands.

Oh really grumpy, that sucks. Oh well I guess I'll have to find another solution, I did order that Sugre stuff, where you make a mold with a 3d printer.

I guess when I get funds I can always get a resin based printer, but while I'm in the learning stages this should be fine.

I'll definitely still try it out Morgan, I think the buttons might be able to be a little stiff since its using a piezo sensor. The really flexible buttons may just be for feel, but I have no idea.

As I said look for the brush on latex moulding rubber, you can build up the thickness and get a good compromise between flexibility and robustness.