Why have an 22ohm resistor these colors? (Se image)

I just don't understand the color coding of this resistor. I have mesured it to be 22ohm, and it stands 22R on the strip, but i don't understand the colors.

It's a little heard to se on the picture, but the colors are from the left red, brown, black, gold...(?) and brown.

That gold strip confuses me...

The gold stripe means 5% tolerance.
22 ohm should be red, red, black.

See 5 band resistor colour codes

Gold band is multiplier of 0.1, so probably, red, red, black, gold, brown = 220 * 0.1 = 22 Ohm, 1% tolerance.

Yes! I missed the brown 1% tolerance stripe.

JCA34F:
Gold band is multiplier of 0.1, so probably, red, red, black, gold, brown = 220 * 0.1 = 22 Ohm, 1% tolerance.

Make sense, i think.

Never seen that combination before. But i'm also new in the game. :slight_smile:

They look, left to right, Red, Red, Black, and Gold so I see 22 no multiplier or multiplier zero followed by Gold for a 5% tolerance. So I see a 22 Ohm resistor having a tolerance of 5%.

Ron

Most modern metal film resistors (cyan body) are 1% or better, so the 3-digit + multiplier + tolerance code
(the 5-band code) is commonly used since these resistors are made in the E48, E96 or E192 values.

Older carbon-film resistors (beige body) were most commonly 10% or 5% and the 2-digit + multiplier +
tolerance (4-band) code was common then since they were usually E12 or E24 values only.

For instance I've inherited a box of yellow/white/white/gold/violet resistors, which are 49.9 ohm 0.1%
499 is an E96 value

JCA34F is correct here, these are 1%.

(BTW some older resistors with 5-bands and a gold 4th band were different, but that's not the case
here with standard modern metal-film in my experience, a 4th gold band is a 0.1x multiplier - all my
stock resistors in the range 1 to 91 ohms are the modern coding)

It's really easy to get confused by the 5 band coloring when expecting 4 band and visa versa...

Having only been faced with 4 band for like 20 years in my youth... I was slowed down intensely by the arrival of 5 band color codes.

You and me both! I have started double checking resistors on a meter now. When I buy more, I try to get the three band types where I can. I think the new background colour adds to the difficulty with reading as well as it is not immediately obvious which end is band one.

I, for one, welcome the new 5-band resistors. I think you will soon find that they are the only kind manufactured. It's cool to have 1% resistors for basically no additional cost - and with no difficulty finding a particular value.

aarg:
I, for one, welcome the new 5-band resistors. I think you will soon find that they are the only kind manufactured. It's cool to have 1% resistors for basically no additional cost - and with no difficulty finding a particular value.

Yes, but still no way to make an exact 1:10 divisor with 2 resistor values...

RIN67630:
Yes, but still no way to make an exact 1:10 divisor with 2 resistor values...

How do you do it with 4 band resistors, then?
I have such a circuit where I use 9.1M,1M. It's not exact but 10.1:1. That's only off by 1%.

aarg:
How do you do it with 4 band resistors, then?
I have such a circuit where I use 9.1M,1M. It's not exact but 10.1:1. That's only off by 1%.

See my post above: You can get a superb precision with just a few resistors of any value...

I have almost abandoned colour coded resistors these days, preferring a simple A4 folder of surface mount parts to a whole rack of small draws.
The solder very well between tracks on a strip board or across breakers in the track.

I only use through hole resistors for photographs of stuff I am having published.

Yes Mike, that is certainly a good idea and I have done it with bypass capacitors on linear regulators. However, getting older means a lack of dexterity and eyesight which makes SMD life interesting to say the least. That may also be why I don't like the four band resistors, I just can't see what they are at a quick glance like I can with the older ones.

Yes that is why a good pair of tweezers and one of these is used a lot these days:-
Visor.jpg

Visor.jpg